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Mountain Temperatures in the Southeastern and Southwestern United States during Late Spring and Early Summer

James T. TannerThe University of Tennessee

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Abstract

The distribution of dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperatures was studied in the Great Smoky Mountains, Tennessee-North Carolina, and in the Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona. Statistical analysis by regression methods showed that temperature change with altitude is generally a function of temperature as well as of the difference in elevation, and that the function changes with the season. These conclusions are graphically summarized in temperature profiles for each region and characteristic temperature. Also studied were the distribution of daily maxima in one valley and the daily course and range of temperatures in the two regions.

Abstract

The distribution of dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperatures was studied in the Great Smoky Mountains, Tennessee-North Carolina, and in the Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona. Statistical analysis by regression methods showed that temperature change with altitude is generally a function of temperature as well as of the difference in elevation, and that the function changes with the season. These conclusions are graphically summarized in temperature profiles for each region and characteristic temperature. Also studied were the distribution of daily maxima in one valley and the daily course and range of temperatures in the two regions.

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