Some New Worldwide Cloud-Cover Models

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  • 1 Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816
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Abstract

Using daily measurements of day and night infrared, and incoming and absorbed solar radiation obtained from a TIROS satellite over a period of approximately 45 months, and integrated over 2.5° latitude-longitude grids, the proportion of cloud cover over each grid each day was derived for the entire period. For each of four 3-month periods, for each grid location, estimates a and b of the two parameters of the best-fit beta distribution were obtained. The (a, b) plane was divided into a number of regions. All the geographical locations whose (a, b) estimates were in the same region in the (a, b) plane were said to have the same cloud cover type for that season. For each season, the world is thus divided into separate cloud-cover types.

Abstract

Using daily measurements of day and night infrared, and incoming and absorbed solar radiation obtained from a TIROS satellite over a period of approximately 45 months, and integrated over 2.5° latitude-longitude grids, the proportion of cloud cover over each grid each day was derived for the entire period. For each of four 3-month periods, for each grid location, estimates a and b of the two parameters of the best-fit beta distribution were obtained. The (a, b) plane was divided into a number of regions. All the geographical locations whose (a, b) estimates were in the same region in the (a, b) plane were said to have the same cloud cover type for that season. For each season, the world is thus divided into separate cloud-cover types.

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