Evaporation at a High Arctic Site

Philip Marsh Department of Geography, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada

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Wayne R. Rouse Department of Geography, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada

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Ming-ko Woo Department of Geography, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada

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Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated empirical relationships between surface soil moisture and the α′ parameter in Priestley and Taylor's version of the combination model. An evaporation study conducted at a high arctic site shows that for gravel and loamy surfaces underlain by permafrost, α′ can be expressed as the following function of soil moisture (Sm):

.

Comparison with α′ and soil moisture relationships obtained in more temperate latitudes suggests that under drying conditions the evaporation rate will be a response to the particular site characteristics, so that there is no unique relationship between surface soil moisture and evaporation rates.

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated empirical relationships between surface soil moisture and the α′ parameter in Priestley and Taylor's version of the combination model. An evaporation study conducted at a high arctic site shows that for gravel and loamy surfaces underlain by permafrost, α′ can be expressed as the following function of soil moisture (Sm):

.

Comparison with α′ and soil moisture relationships obtained in more temperate latitudes suggests that under drying conditions the evaporation rate will be a response to the particular site characteristics, so that there is no unique relationship between surface soil moisture and evaporation rates.

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