The Climatology of Hailstone Embryos

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  • 1 National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307
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Abstract

Data on hailstone embryo types, using a broad classification as graupel or frozen drops, are presented from several geographical areas representing distinctly different storm “climatologies.” The relative frequency of the two embryo types varies greatly from area to area, in a Way that correlates rather well with average cloud-base temperature. The warmer based clouds produce hail with more frozen drop embryos. The correlation may be explainable either in terms of the dominant precipitation growth process—liquid coalescence or the ice process—or in terms of recycling of embryos, or both. In light of these results, the transferability of any hail suppression technology from one area to another should not be considered to be automatic.

Abstract

Data on hailstone embryo types, using a broad classification as graupel or frozen drops, are presented from several geographical areas representing distinctly different storm “climatologies.” The relative frequency of the two embryo types varies greatly from area to area, in a Way that correlates rather well with average cloud-base temperature. The warmer based clouds produce hail with more frozen drop embryos. The correlation may be explainable either in terms of the dominant precipitation growth process—liquid coalescence or the ice process—or in terms of recycling of embryos, or both. In light of these results, the transferability of any hail suppression technology from one area to another should not be considered to be automatic.

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