An Analysis of the Ground Temperature and Reflectivity Pattern about St. Louis, Missouri, Using HCMM Satellite Data

Fred M. Vukovich Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709

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Abstract

Ground temperatures and reflectivity patterns have been examined for the area in and surrounding St. Louis, Missouri, using HCMM satellite data. Analyses demonstrate marked seasonal and day/night differences. In the warm season and during the day, the ground temperature distribution is influenced by small-scale land use features. The temperature contrast between the urban and rural region averages about 4.3°C. In the cold season and during the daytime, the pattern is similar to that found in the warm season, but the temperature contrasts are not as large (the temperature contrast between the urban and rum region is 2.4°C). At night, the ground temperature pattern does not show a strong dependence on small-scale land-use features. The temperature contrast between the urban and rural regions is about 2.5°C, which is similar to that found in the cold season during the day.

The reflectivity is low in the central portion of St. Louis and in other smaller urban areas surrounding St. Louis. Difference in reflectivity between the center of St. Louis and the surrounding suburban and rural regions ranges from 2 to 4 percentage points, similar to albedo differences observed by White et al. (1978) and Dabberdt and Davis (1974).

Abstract

Ground temperatures and reflectivity patterns have been examined for the area in and surrounding St. Louis, Missouri, using HCMM satellite data. Analyses demonstrate marked seasonal and day/night differences. In the warm season and during the day, the ground temperature distribution is influenced by small-scale land use features. The temperature contrast between the urban and rural region averages about 4.3°C. In the cold season and during the daytime, the pattern is similar to that found in the warm season, but the temperature contrasts are not as large (the temperature contrast between the urban and rum region is 2.4°C). At night, the ground temperature pattern does not show a strong dependence on small-scale land-use features. The temperature contrast between the urban and rural regions is about 2.5°C, which is similar to that found in the cold season during the day.

The reflectivity is low in the central portion of St. Louis and in other smaller urban areas surrounding St. Louis. Difference in reflectivity between the center of St. Louis and the surrounding suburban and rural regions ranges from 2 to 4 percentage points, similar to albedo differences observed by White et al. (1978) and Dabberdt and Davis (1974).

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