Aerosol Transport in the Southern Sierra Nevada

D. M. Ewell Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, California

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R. G. Flocchini Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, California

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L. O. Myrup Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, California

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T. A. Cahill Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. University of California, Davis, California

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Abstract

Aerosol transport and meteorology were investigated during 10 days in August 1985, at three elevations in the southern Sierra. Ground weather station and pilot balloon data revealed the diurnal variation of the topographic winds to be remarkably similar from day to day unless disrupted by synoptic meteorological events. Vertical aerosol and meteorological profiles were collected up to 250 m above ground level at one of the study sites using tethered balloon systems. Afternoon aerosol concentrations and horizontal fluxes were significantly higher than those in the morning and evening. No vertical gradients in aerosol concentration were detected expect during the evening profiles for coarse aerosols.

Abstract

Aerosol transport and meteorology were investigated during 10 days in August 1985, at three elevations in the southern Sierra. Ground weather station and pilot balloon data revealed the diurnal variation of the topographic winds to be remarkably similar from day to day unless disrupted by synoptic meteorological events. Vertical aerosol and meteorological profiles were collected up to 250 m above ground level at one of the study sites using tethered balloon systems. Afternoon aerosol concentrations and horizontal fluxes were significantly higher than those in the morning and evening. No vertical gradients in aerosol concentration were detected expect during the evening profiles for coarse aerosols.

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