Impact of Two Microphysical Schemes upon Gas Scavenging and Deposition in a Mesoscale Meteorological Model

View More View Less
  • a LAMP/OPGC, Clermont-Ferrand, France
  • | b NOAA, Forecast Systems Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado
© Get Permissions Rent on DeepDyve
Restricted access

Abstract

Two widely used microphysical schemes are compared to evaluate their possible impact on wet deposition mechanisms. They are based upon different spectral distributions for raindrops (Marshall-Palmer and lognormal distributions) and use different formulations for the autoconversion and evaporation process, as well as for the fall velocity of raindrops. A comparative study of these two schemes is carried out for a two-dimensional mountain wave simulation in a mesoscale meteorological model. Differences in the spatial and temporal evolution of microphysical fields are investigated. The two schemes are compared for simple chemical scenarios: gas dissolution in cloud and rain, gas scavenging by raindrops, and wet deposition. Results contrast the differing behavior of the two schemes in describing processes such as the direct scavenging of gases by raindrops and the release of chemical species back into the atmosphere because of below-cloud evaporation of rain.

Abstract

Two widely used microphysical schemes are compared to evaluate their possible impact on wet deposition mechanisms. They are based upon different spectral distributions for raindrops (Marshall-Palmer and lognormal distributions) and use different formulations for the autoconversion and evaporation process, as well as for the fall velocity of raindrops. A comparative study of these two schemes is carried out for a two-dimensional mountain wave simulation in a mesoscale meteorological model. Differences in the spatial and temporal evolution of microphysical fields are investigated. The two schemes are compared for simple chemical scenarios: gas dissolution in cloud and rain, gas scavenging by raindrops, and wet deposition. Results contrast the differing behavior of the two schemes in describing processes such as the direct scavenging of gases by raindrops and the release of chemical species back into the atmosphere because of below-cloud evaporation of rain.

Save