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The Numerical Simulation of Airflow and Dispersion in Three-Dimensional Atmospheric Recirculation Zones

Paul DawsonUniversity of Idaho Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho

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David E. StockMechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington

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Brian LambLaboratory for Atmospheric Research, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington

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Abstract

A three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic numerical code using the two-equation turbulence closure was developed to model the atmospheric transport and diffusion of pollutants over buildings and a three-dimensional hill. The standard engineering two-equation, first-order turbulence closure was modified to account for surface layer effects and the reduced production of dissipation in the region above the surface layer found in an atmospheric boundary layer.

The computations for the dispersion of a building rooftop release showed good agreement with wind tunnel measurements, except when very close to the ground. The transport and dispersion of a plume over a 300-m conical hill, Steptoe Butte, was also simulated. The computations are compared with near ground-level field measurements.

Abstract

A three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic numerical code using the two-equation turbulence closure was developed to model the atmospheric transport and diffusion of pollutants over buildings and a three-dimensional hill. The standard engineering two-equation, first-order turbulence closure was modified to account for surface layer effects and the reduced production of dissipation in the region above the surface layer found in an atmospheric boundary layer.

The computations for the dispersion of a building rooftop release showed good agreement with wind tunnel measurements, except when very close to the ground. The transport and dispersion of a plume over a 300-m conical hill, Steptoe Butte, was also simulated. The computations are compared with near ground-level field measurements.

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