Comparison Of Monthly Rain Rates Derived from GPI and SSM/I Using Probability Distribution Functions

Long S. Chiu General Sciences Corporation, Laurel, Maryland

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Alfred T. C. Chang Hydrological Sciences Branch, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

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John Janowiak Climate Analysis Center, NOAA/NMC/CAC, Washington, D.C

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Abstract

Three years of monthly rain rates over 5° × 5° latitude–longitude boxes have been calculated for oceanic regions 50°N–50°S from measurements taken by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager on board the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellites using the technique developed by Wilheit et al. The annual and seasonal zonal-mean rain rates are larger than Jaeger's climatological estimates but are smaller than those estimated from the GOES precipitation index (GPI) for the same period. Regional comparison with the GPI showed that these rain rates are smaller in the north Indian Ocean and in the southern extratropics where the GPI is known to overestimate. The differences are also dominated by a jump at 170°W in the GPI rain rates across the mid Pacific Ocean. This jump is attributed to the fusion of different satellite measurements in producing the GPI.

Abstract

Three years of monthly rain rates over 5° × 5° latitude–longitude boxes have been calculated for oceanic regions 50°N–50°S from measurements taken by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager on board the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellites using the technique developed by Wilheit et al. The annual and seasonal zonal-mean rain rates are larger than Jaeger's climatological estimates but are smaller than those estimated from the GOES precipitation index (GPI) for the same period. Regional comparison with the GPI showed that these rain rates are smaller in the north Indian Ocean and in the southern extratropics where the GPI is known to overestimate. The differences are also dominated by a jump at 170°W in the GPI rain rates across the mid Pacific Ocean. This jump is attributed to the fusion of different satellite measurements in producing the GPI.

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