Stochastic Filtering of Rain Profiles Using Radar, Surface-Referenced Radar, or Combined Radar–Radiometer Measurements

Ziad S. Haddad Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

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Eastwood Im Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

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Stephen L. Durden Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

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Scott Hensley Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

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Abstract

This paper describes a computationally efficient nearly optimal Bayesian algorithm to estimate rain (and drop size distribution) profiles, given a radar reflectivity profile at a single attenuating wavelength. In addition to estimating the averages of all the mutually ambiguous combinations of rain parameters that can produce the data observed, the approach also calculates the rms uncertainty in its estimates (this uncertainty thus quantifies the “amount of ambiguity” in the “solution”). The paper also describes a more general approach that can make estimates based on a radar reflectivity profile together with an approximate measurement of the path-integrated attenuation, or a radar reflectivity profile and a set of passive microwave brightness temperatures. This more general “combined” algorithm is currently being adapted for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission.

Abstract

This paper describes a computationally efficient nearly optimal Bayesian algorithm to estimate rain (and drop size distribution) profiles, given a radar reflectivity profile at a single attenuating wavelength. In addition to estimating the averages of all the mutually ambiguous combinations of rain parameters that can produce the data observed, the approach also calculates the rms uncertainty in its estimates (this uncertainty thus quantifies the “amount of ambiguity” in the “solution”). The paper also describes a more general approach that can make estimates based on a radar reflectivity profile together with an approximate measurement of the path-integrated attenuation, or a radar reflectivity profile and a set of passive microwave brightness temperatures. This more general “combined” algorithm is currently being adapted for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission.

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