Effect of Land-Use Pattern on the Development of Low-Level Jets

Yihua Wu Department of Marine, Earth and Atmosphere Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina

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Sethu Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmosphere Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina

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Abstract

Land-use patterns are a major factor that causes land surface heterogeneities, which in turn influence the development of mesoscale circulations. In the present study, effects of land-use patterns on the formation and structure of mesoscale circulations were investigated using the North Carolina State University mesoscale model linked with the soil–vegetation system. The Midwest type of low-level jet (LLJ) was successfully generated in the model simulation. Characteristics of the LLJ generated in the numerical experiments are consistent with observations. The results suggest that land surface heterogeneities could have significant impacts on the formation and the maintenance of the LLJ.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Sethu Raman, Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmosphere Sciences, North Carolina State University, Box 8208, Raleigh, NC 27695-8208.

s_raman@ncsu.edu

Abstract

Land-use patterns are a major factor that causes land surface heterogeneities, which in turn influence the development of mesoscale circulations. In the present study, effects of land-use patterns on the formation and structure of mesoscale circulations were investigated using the North Carolina State University mesoscale model linked with the soil–vegetation system. The Midwest type of low-level jet (LLJ) was successfully generated in the model simulation. Characteristics of the LLJ generated in the numerical experiments are consistent with observations. The results suggest that land surface heterogeneities could have significant impacts on the formation and the maintenance of the LLJ.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Sethu Raman, Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmosphere Sciences, North Carolina State University, Box 8208, Raleigh, NC 27695-8208.

s_raman@ncsu.edu

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