• Abdalati, W., and K. Steffen, 1997: Snowmelt on the Greenland ice sheet as derived from passive microwave satellite data. J. Climate,10, 165–175.

  • Baldwin, D. G., and W. J. Emery, 1993: A systematized approach to AVHRR image navigation. Ann. Glaciol.,17, 414–420.

  • Barlow, L. K., J. W. C. White, R. G. Barry, J. C. Rogers, and P. M. Grootes, 1993: The North Atlantic Oscillation signature in deuterium and deuterium excess signals in the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 ice core, 1840–1970. Geophys. Res. Lett.,20, 2901–2904.

  • Dozier, J., and S. G. Warren, 1982: Effect of viewing angle on the infrared brightness temperature of snow. Water Resour. Res.,18, 1424–1434.

  • Gloersen, P., W. Campbell, D. Cavalieri, J. Comiso, C. Parkinson, and J. Zwally, 1992: Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, 1978–1987: Satellite passive-microwave observations and analysis. NASA SP-511, 290 pp.

  • Groisman, P. Y., T. R. Karl, and R. W. Knight, 1994: Changes of snow cover, temperature, and radiative heat balance over the Northern Hemisphere. J. Climate,7, 1633–1656.

  • Haefliger, M., K. Steffen, and C. Fowler, 1993: AVHRR surface temperature and narrow-band albedo comparison with ground measurements for the Greenland ice sheet. Ann. Glaciol.,17, 49–54.

  • Hurrell, J., 1995: Decadal trends in the North Atlantic Oscillation: Regional temperatures and precipitation. Science,269, 676–679.

  • Key, J., 1996: The Cloud and Surface Parameter Retrieval (CASPR) system user’s guide. Dept. of Geography, Boston University, Tech. Rep. 96-02, 90 pp. [Available from Jeff Key, Dept. of Geography, Boston University, 675 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215.].

  • ——, and M. Haefliger, 1992: Arctic ice surface temperature retrieval from AVHRR thermal channels. J. Geophys. Res.,97, 5885–5893.

  • ——, J. Collins, C. Fowler, and R. Stone, 1996: High-latitude surface temperature estimates from thermal satellite data. Remote Sens. Environ., in press.

  • Kidwell, K. B., 1991: NOAA polar orbiter data users guide. NOAA Information Service and Climate Data Center, Satellite Data Service Division, Washington, DC, 204 pp. [Available from NCDC, World Weather Building, Rm. 100, Washington, DC 20233.].

  • Lindsay, R. W., and D. A. Rothrock, 1994: Arctic sea ice surface temperature from AVHRR. J. Climate,7, 174–183.

  • McClain, E. P., W. G. Pichel, and C. C. Walton, 1985: Comparative performance of AVHRR-based multichannel sea surface temperatures. J. Geophys. Res.,90, 11587–11601.

  • McMillin, L. M., 1975: Estimation of sea surface temperatures from two infrared window measurements with different absorption. J. Geophys. Res.,80, 5113–5117.

  • Miller, D. H., 1956: The influence of snow cover on local climate in Greenland. J. Meteor.,13, 112–120.

  • Minnus, P., E. F. Harrison, L. L. Stowe, G. G. Gibson, F. M. Denn, D. R. Doelling, and W. L. Smith Jr., 1993: Radiative climate forcing by the Mount Pinatubo eruption. Science,259, 1411–1415.

  • Price, J. C., 1983: Estimating surface temperature from satellite thermal infrared data—A simple formulation for the atmospheric effect. Remote Sens. Environ.,13, 353–361.

  • Rao, C. R. N., 1993: Nonlinearity corrections for the thermal infrared channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer: Assessment and recommendations. NOAA Tech. Rep. NESDIS- 69, NOAA/NESDIS, Washington, DC, 31 pp. [Available from NOAA/NESDIS Satellite Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20233.].

  • Raschke, E., P. Bauer, and H. J. Lutz, 1992: Remote sensing of clouds and surface radiation budget over polar regions. Int. J. Remote Sens.,13, 13–22.

  • Salisbury, J. W., D. M. D’Aria, and A. Wald, 1994: Measurementsof thermal infrared spectral reflectance of frost, snow, and ice. J. Geophys. Res.,99, 24235–24240.

  • Serreze, M., J. Maslanik, J. Key, and R. Kokaly, 1995: Diagnosis of the record minimum in Arctic sea ice area during 1990 and associated snow cover extremes. Geophys. Res. Lett.,22, 2183–2186.

  • Steffen, K., 1995: AVHRR applications for ice surface studies. Oceanographic Applications of Remote Sensing, M. Ikeda and F. W. Dobson, Eds., CRC Press, 307–320.

  • ——, W. Abdalati, and J. Stroeve, 1993: Climate sensitivity studiesof the Greenland ice sheet using satellite AVHRR, SMMR, SSM/I, and in situ data. Meteor. Atmos. Phys.,51, 239–258.

  • Stroeve, J., M. Haefliger, and K. Steffen, 1996: Surface temperature from ERS-1 ATSR infrared thermal satellite data in polar regions. J. Appl. Meteor.,35, 1231–1239.

  • Wald, A., 1994: Modeling thermal infrared (2–14 μm) reflectance spectra of frost and snow. J. Geophys. Res.,99, 24241–24250.

  • Yamanouchi, T., and S. Kawaguchi, 1992: Cloud distribution in the Antarctic from AVHRR data and radiation measurements at the surface. Int. J. Remote Sens.,13, 111–127.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 142 135 9
PDF Downloads 66 60 8

Variability of AVHRR-Derived Clear-Sky Surface Temperature over the Greenland Ice Sheet

View More View Less
  • a National Snow and Ice Data Center and Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado
  • | b Center for the Study of Earth from Space, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and Department of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado
© Get Permissions Rent on DeepDyve
Restricted access

Abstract

The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer is used to derive surface temperatures for one satellite pass under clear skies over the Greenland ice sheet from 1989 through 1993. The results of these temperatures are presented as monthly means, and their spatial and temporal variability are discussed. Accuracy of the dry snow surface temperatures is estimated to be better than 1 K during summer. This error is expected to increase during polar night due to problems in cloud identification. Results indicate the surface temperature of the Greenland ice sheet is strongly dominated by topography, with minimum surface temperatures associated with the high elevation regions. In the summer, maximum surface temperatures occur during July along the western coast and southern tip of the ice sheet. Minimum temperatures are found at the summit during summer and move farther north during polar night. Large interannual variability in surface temperatures occurs during winter associated with katabatic storm events. Summer temperatures show little variation, although 1992 stands out as being colder than the other years. The reason for the lower temperatures during 1992 is believed to be a result of the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Julienne Stroeve, National Snow and Ice Data Center, CIRES, University of Colorado, Box 449, Boulder, CO 80309-0449.

Stroeve@kodiak.colorado.edu

Abstract

The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer is used to derive surface temperatures for one satellite pass under clear skies over the Greenland ice sheet from 1989 through 1993. The results of these temperatures are presented as monthly means, and their spatial and temporal variability are discussed. Accuracy of the dry snow surface temperatures is estimated to be better than 1 K during summer. This error is expected to increase during polar night due to problems in cloud identification. Results indicate the surface temperature of the Greenland ice sheet is strongly dominated by topography, with minimum surface temperatures associated with the high elevation regions. In the summer, maximum surface temperatures occur during July along the western coast and southern tip of the ice sheet. Minimum temperatures are found at the summit during summer and move farther north during polar night. Large interannual variability in surface temperatures occurs during winter associated with katabatic storm events. Summer temperatures show little variation, although 1992 stands out as being colder than the other years. The reason for the lower temperatures during 1992 is believed to be a result of the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Julienne Stroeve, National Snow and Ice Data Center, CIRES, University of Colorado, Box 449, Boulder, CO 80309-0449.

Stroeve@kodiak.colorado.edu

Save