• Anthes, R. A., 1977: A cumulus parameterization scheme utilizing a one-dimensional cloud model. Mon. Wea. Rev.,105, 270–286.

  • Betts, A. K., J. H. Ball, A. C. M. Beljaars, M. J. Miller, and P. Viterbo, 1994: Coupling between land-surface boundary-layer parameterization and rainfall on local and regional scales: Lessons from the wet summer of 1993. Preprints, Fifth Conf. on Global Change Studies, Nashville, TN, Amer. Meteor. Soc., 174–181.

  • Brubaker, K. L., D. Entekhabi, and P. S. Eagleson, 1993: Estimation of continental precipitation recycling. J. Climate,6, 1077–1089.

  • Changnon, S. A., 1996: The Great Flood of 1993, Causes, Impacts and Responses, Westview Press, 321 pp.

  • Copeland, J., R. A. Pielke, and T. Kittel, 1996: Potential impacts of vegetation change: A regional modeling study. J. Geophys. Res.,101, 7409–7418.

  • Eltahir, E. A. B, and R. L. Bras, 1996: Precipitation recycling. Rev. Geophys.,34, 367–378.

  • Foland, C. K., T. Karl, and K. Y. Vinnikov, 1991: Observed climate variations and change. Climate Change, the IPCC Scientific Assessment, J. T. Houghton, G. J. Jenkins, and J. J. Ephraums, Eds., Cambridge University Press, 199–238.

  • Giorgi, F., L. O. Meams, C. Shields, and L. Mayer, 1996: A regional model study of the importance of local versus remote controls of the 1988 drought and the 1993 flood over the central United States. J. Climate,9, 1150–1162.

  • Grell, G. A., J. F. Dudhia, and D. Stauffer, 1993: A description of the fifth generation Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5). NCAR Tech. Note NCAR/TN-398+IA, 107 pp. [Available from National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000.].

  • Kuo, S. L., 1974: Further studies of the parameterization of the effect of cumulus convection on large-scale flow. J. Atmos. Sci.,31, 1232–1240.

  • Mintz, Y., 1984: The sensitivity of numerically simulated climates to land-surface boundary conditions. The Global Climate, J. T. Houghton, Ed., Cambridge University Press, 79–105.

  • Moore, M. R., W. M. Crosswhite, and J. E. Hostetler, 1987: Agricultural water use in the United States, 1950–1985. U.S. Geological Survey Water Supply Paper 2350, 93–108. [Available from U.S. Geological Survey, Federal Center, Box 25425, Denver, CO 80225.].

  • Paegle, J., K. C. Mo, and J. Nogues-Paegle, 1996: Dependence of simulated precipitation on surface evaporation during 1993 United States summer floods. Mon. Wea. Rev.,124, 345–361.

  • Pan, Z., M. Segal, R. Turner, and E. Takle, 1995: Model simulation of impacts of transient surface wetness on summer rainfall in the United States Midwest during drought and flood years. Mon. Wea. Rev.,123, 1575–1581.

  • ——, E. Takle, M. Segal, and R. Turner, 1996: Influences of model parameterization schemes on the response of rainfall to soil moisture in the central United States. Mon. Wea. Rev.,124, 1786–1802.

  • Pastel, S., 1993: Water and agriculture. Water in Crisis, P. H. Gleick, Ed., Oxford University Press, 56–66.

  • Plantico, M. S., T. R. Karl, G. Kukla, and J. Gavin, 1990: Is recent climate change across the United States related to rising levels of anthropogenic greenhouse gases? J. Geophys. Res.,95, 16617–16637.

  • Segal, M., and R. W. Arritt, 1992: Nonclassical mesoscale circulations caused by surface sensible heat-flux gradients. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.,73, 1593–1604.

  • ——, R. Avissar, M. McCumber, and R. A. Pielke, 1988: Evaluation of vegetation cover effects on the generation and modification of mesoscale circulations. J. Atmos. Sci.,45, 2268–2292.

  • ——, R. W. Arritt, C. Clark, R. Rabin, and J. Brown, 1995: Scaling evaluation of the effect of surface characteristics on potential for deep convection over uniform terrain. Mon. Wea. Rev.,123, 383–400.

  • van Dewier Leeden, F., F. L. Troise, and D. K. Todd, Eds., 1990: The Water Encyclopedia, Lewis, 808 pp.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 124 53 5
PDF Downloads 102 42 5

On the Potential Impact of Irrigated Areas in North America on Summer Rainfall Caused by Large-Scale Systems

M. SegalAgricultural Meteorology, Department of Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

Search for other papers by M. Segal in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Z. PanAgricultural Meteorology, Department of Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

Search for other papers by Z. Pan in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
R. W. TurnerDepartment of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

Search for other papers by R. W. Turner in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
E. S. TakleDepartment of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

Search for other papers by E. S. Takle in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Abstract

The potential impact of the increase in irrigated areas in North America during the past 100 years on summer rainfall associated with medium- to large-scale precipitation systems is evaluated conceptually and by several illustrative numerical model simulations. The model results for the simulated cases suggest a tendency toward some increase in the continental-average rainfall for the present irrigation conditions compared with those of past irrigation. The maximum increase obtained for several studied cases of 6-day duration each was 1.7%. Rainfall increases typically occur in the location of existing rainfall areas, and the main effect of irrigation is to redistribute rainfall in those preexisting precipitation regions.

Corresponding author address: Moti Segal, Agricultural Meteorology, Department of Agronomy, Iowa State University, 3010 Agronomy, Ames, IA 50011-1010.

segal@iastate.edu

Abstract

The potential impact of the increase in irrigated areas in North America during the past 100 years on summer rainfall associated with medium- to large-scale precipitation systems is evaluated conceptually and by several illustrative numerical model simulations. The model results for the simulated cases suggest a tendency toward some increase in the continental-average rainfall for the present irrigation conditions compared with those of past irrigation. The maximum increase obtained for several studied cases of 6-day duration each was 1.7%. Rainfall increases typically occur in the location of existing rainfall areas, and the main effect of irrigation is to redistribute rainfall in those preexisting precipitation regions.

Corresponding author address: Moti Segal, Agricultural Meteorology, Department of Agronomy, Iowa State University, 3010 Agronomy, Ames, IA 50011-1010.

segal@iastate.edu

Save