• Buermann, W., J. Dong, X. Zeng, R. B. Myneni, and R. E. Dickinson. 2001. Evaluation of the utility of satellite-based vegetation leaf area index data for climate simulations. J. Climate 14:35363550.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • DeFries, R., M. Hansen, J. R. G. Townshend, and R. Sohlberg. 1998. Global land cover classifications at 8-km spatial resolution: The use of training data derived from Landsat imagery in decision tree classifiers. Int. J. Remote Sens. 19:31413168.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • DeFries, R., M. Hansen, and J. R. G. Townshend. 2000. Global continuous fields of vegetation characteristics: A linear mixture model applied to multi-year 8-km AVHRR data. Int. J. Remote Sens. 21:13891414.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Goetz, S. J., S. D. Prince, J. Small, and A. C. R. Gleason. 2000. Interannual variability of global terrestrial primary production: Results of a model driven with satellite observations. J. Geophys. Res. 105:2007720091.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • James, M. E. and S. N. V. Kalluri. 1994. The Pathfinder AVHRR land data set—An improved coarse resolution data set for terrestrial monitoring. Int. J. Remote Sens. 15:33473363.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kalluri, S., A. Desch, T. Curry, A. Altstatt, D. Devers, J. Townshend, and C. Tucker. 2001. Historical satellite data used to map pan-Amazon forest cover. Eos, Trans. Amer. Geophys. Union 82:201207.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Loveland, T. R., B. C. Reed, J. F. Brown, D. O. Ohlen, Z. Zhu, L. Yang, and J. W. Merchant. 2000. Development of a global land cover characteristics database and IGBP DISCover from 1 km AVHRR data. Int. J. Remote Sens. 21:13031330.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Myneni, R. B., C. J. Tucker, G. Asrar, and C. D. Keeling. 1998. Interannual variations in satellite sensed vegetation index data from 1981 to 1991. J. Geophys. Res. 103:61456160.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Nicholson, S. E., C. J. Tucker, and M. B. Ma. 1998. Desertification, drought, and surface vegetation: An example from the West African Sahel. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc. 79:815829.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Tucker, C. J., H. E. Dregne, and W. W. Newcomb. 1991. Expansion and contraction of the Sahara Desert from 1980 to 1990. Science 253:299301.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Tucker, C. J., D. A. Slayback, J. E. Pinzon, S. O. Los, R. B. Myneni, and M. G. Taylor. 2001. Higher northern latitude normalized difference vegetation index and growing season trends from 1982 to 1999. Int. J. Biometeor. 45:184190.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wittich, K-P. and O. Hansing. 1995. Area-averaged vegetation cover fraction estimated from satellite data. Int. J. Biometeor. 38:209215.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Zeng, X., R. E. Dickinson, A. Walker, M. Shaikh, R. S. DeFries, and J. Qi. 2000. Derivation and evaluation of global 1-km fractional vegetation cover data for land modeling. J. Appl. Meteor. 39:826839.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Zeng, X., M. Shaikh, Y. Dai, R. E. Dickinson, and R. Myneni. 2002. Coupling of the common land model to the NCAR Community Climate Model. J. Climate 15:18321854.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Zhou, L. M., C. J. Tucker, R. K. Kaufmann, D. Slayback, N. V. Shabanov, and R. B. Myneni. 2001. Variations in northern vegetation activity inferred from satellite data of vegetation index during 1981 to 1999. J. Geophys. Res. 106:2006920083.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 365 93 3
PDF Downloads 130 67 1

Interannual Variability and Decadal Trend of Global Fractional Vegetation Cover from 1982 to 2000

View More View Less
  • a Department of Atmospheric Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
  • | b Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, and Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, Maryland
  • | c Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, Maryland
Restricted access

Abstract

Fractional vegetation cover (FVC) is one of the most important variables in land surface modeling and also provides a continuous field to complement discrete land cover classification. A global 8-km FVC dataset for 1982–2000 is derived using the NOAA–NASA land Pathfinder normalized difference vegetation index data. The confidence in the dataset is provided by the insensitivity of the algorithm to the data resolution (between 1 and 8 km), the good agreement of the results with the field survey data over Germany, the consistency of the results with previous observational studies over the savannas in North Africa and the forests in Bolivia, and the robustness of the algorithm, as demonstrated by the small interannual variability of FVC over areas where anthropogenic land cover change is expected to be small, based on the 30-m Landsat data analysis. Significant interannual variability is found over shrubland, savanna, and grassland; both positive and negative trends exist over different areas of the same region in many parts of the world. In particular, the trend analysis pinpoints areas with statistically significant trends (i.e., “hotspots”) for further study using higher-resolution satellite data and field-survey data.

Corresponding author address: Xubin Zeng, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, The University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210081, Tucson, AZ 85721. xubin@atmo.arizona.edu

Abstract

Fractional vegetation cover (FVC) is one of the most important variables in land surface modeling and also provides a continuous field to complement discrete land cover classification. A global 8-km FVC dataset for 1982–2000 is derived using the NOAA–NASA land Pathfinder normalized difference vegetation index data. The confidence in the dataset is provided by the insensitivity of the algorithm to the data resolution (between 1 and 8 km), the good agreement of the results with the field survey data over Germany, the consistency of the results with previous observational studies over the savannas in North Africa and the forests in Bolivia, and the robustness of the algorithm, as demonstrated by the small interannual variability of FVC over areas where anthropogenic land cover change is expected to be small, based on the 30-m Landsat data analysis. Significant interannual variability is found over shrubland, savanna, and grassland; both positive and negative trends exist over different areas of the same region in many parts of the world. In particular, the trend analysis pinpoints areas with statistically significant trends (i.e., “hotspots”) for further study using higher-resolution satellite data and field-survey data.

Corresponding author address: Xubin Zeng, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, The University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210081, Tucson, AZ 85721. xubin@atmo.arizona.edu

Save