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Differences of Rainfall Estimates over Land by Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI)—Dependence on Storm Height

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  • 1 Hydrospheric Atmospheric Research Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
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Abstract

It is well known that precipitation rate estimation is poor over land. Using the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), the performance of the TMI rain estimation was investigated. Their differences over land were checked by using the orbit-by-orbit data for June 1998, December 1998, January 1999, and February 1999, and the following results were obtained: 1) Rain rate (RR) near the surface for the TMI (TMI-RR) is smaller than that for the PR (PR-RR) in winter; it is also smaller from 0900 to 1800 LT. These dependencies show some variations at various latitudes or local times. 2) When the storm height is low (<5 km), the TMI-RR is smaller than the PR-RR; when it is high (>8 km), the PR-RR is smaller. These dependencies of the RR on the storm height do not depend on local time or latitude. The tendency for a TMI-RR to be smaller when the storm height is low is more noticeable in convective rain than in stratiform rain. 3) Rain with a low storm height predominates in winter or from 0600 to 1500 LT, and convective rain occurs frequently from 1200 to 2100 LT. Result 1 can be explained by results 2 and 3. It can be concluded that the TMI underestimates rain with low storm height over land because of the weakness of the TMI algorithm, especially for convective rain. On the other hand, it is speculated that TMI overestimates rain with high storm height because of the effect of anvil rain with low brightness temperatures at high frequencies without rain near the surface, and because of the effect of evaporation or tilting, which is indicated by a PR profile and does not appear in the TMI profile. Moreover, it was found that the PR rain for the cases with no TMI rain amounted to about 10%–30% of the total but that the TMI rain for the cases with no PR rain accounted for only a few percent of the TMI rain. This result can be explained by the difficulty of detecting shallow rain with the TMI.

Corresponding author address: Fumie A. Furuzawa, Hydrospheric Atmospheric Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan. akimoto@hyarc.nagoya-u.ac.jp

Abstract

It is well known that precipitation rate estimation is poor over land. Using the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), the performance of the TMI rain estimation was investigated. Their differences over land were checked by using the orbit-by-orbit data for June 1998, December 1998, January 1999, and February 1999, and the following results were obtained: 1) Rain rate (RR) near the surface for the TMI (TMI-RR) is smaller than that for the PR (PR-RR) in winter; it is also smaller from 0900 to 1800 LT. These dependencies show some variations at various latitudes or local times. 2) When the storm height is low (<5 km), the TMI-RR is smaller than the PR-RR; when it is high (>8 km), the PR-RR is smaller. These dependencies of the RR on the storm height do not depend on local time or latitude. The tendency for a TMI-RR to be smaller when the storm height is low is more noticeable in convective rain than in stratiform rain. 3) Rain with a low storm height predominates in winter or from 0600 to 1500 LT, and convective rain occurs frequently from 1200 to 2100 LT. Result 1 can be explained by results 2 and 3. It can be concluded that the TMI underestimates rain with low storm height over land because of the weakness of the TMI algorithm, especially for convective rain. On the other hand, it is speculated that TMI overestimates rain with high storm height because of the effect of anvil rain with low brightness temperatures at high frequencies without rain near the surface, and because of the effect of evaporation or tilting, which is indicated by a PR profile and does not appear in the TMI profile. Moreover, it was found that the PR rain for the cases with no TMI rain amounted to about 10%–30% of the total but that the TMI rain for the cases with no PR rain accounted for only a few percent of the TMI rain. This result can be explained by the difficulty of detecting shallow rain with the TMI.

Corresponding author address: Fumie A. Furuzawa, Hydrospheric Atmospheric Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan. akimoto@hyarc.nagoya-u.ac.jp

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