Mathematical and Synoptic Aspects of a Small-Scale Wave Disturbance Over the Lower Great Lakes Area

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  • 1 Air Services Meteorological Branch, Department of Transport, Toronto, Canada
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Abstract

A squall line which crossed the lower Great Lakes area on 13 March 1963 is described. Characteristics of the squall line are compared to typical features of such phenomena deduced in other studies. The instability line was unusual in terms of the associated surface weather. It extended for a considerable distance over a low-level Arctic frontal zone and had a propagation speed and length-of-life in excess of typical values. The disturbance was found to conform closely to the equations developed by Goldie for internal gravity waves of a somewhat smaller scale. Favorable conditions for the development of such wave phenomena are discussed briefly, together with their possible implications in synoptic-scale analysis and forecasting.

Abstract

A squall line which crossed the lower Great Lakes area on 13 March 1963 is described. Characteristics of the squall line are compared to typical features of such phenomena deduced in other studies. The instability line was unusual in terms of the associated surface weather. It extended for a considerable distance over a low-level Arctic frontal zone and had a propagation speed and length-of-life in excess of typical values. The disturbance was found to conform closely to the equations developed by Goldie for internal gravity waves of a somewhat smaller scale. Favorable conditions for the development of such wave phenomena are discussed briefly, together with their possible implications in synoptic-scale analysis and forecasting.

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