Geographical characteristics of raindrop size distribution in the southern parts of Korea

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  • 1 Department of Future Technology and Convergence Research, Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT), Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang, Republic of Korea
  • 2 Department of Environmental Atmospheric Sciences, Pukyong National University (PKNU), Nam-gu, Busan, Republic of Korea
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Abstract

This study analyzed the regional characteristics of raindrop size distribution (DSD) in the southern coastal area of South Korea. Data from March 2016 to February 2017 were recorded by four PARSIVEL disdrometers installed at intervals of ~20 km from the coastline to inland. Within 20 km from the coastline, multiple local maxima in the probability density function (PDF) were observed at Dm (mass-weighted drop diameter) = 0.6 mm and logNw (normalized intercept parameter) = 5.2 for stratiform rainfall, but these features were not observed more than 20 km from the coastline. Based on mean Dm–logNw values, stratiform rainfall clearly differed between coastal and inland areas. For convective precipitation, there was a linear relationship between Dm and Nw with the distance from the coastline. PDF analyses of diurnal variation in DSD confirmed that in spring and autumn the multiple local maxima appear in the daytime. The multiple local maxima in Dm (logNw) values were lower (higher) at nighttime (NT) than DT in the spring and summer season. These features were highly dependent on the prevailing wind. There was a pattern of increasing A and decreasing b in the radar reflectivity–rainfall rate (ZR) relationship (Z = ARb) with distance from the coastline, and these features were more pronounced in convective precipitation. These diurnal variabilities were regular in stratiform rainfall, and there were large differences in quantitative precipitation estimation depending on the land–sea breeze in the coastal area.

Corresponding Author: Dr. Dong-In Lee (leedi@pknu.ac.kr)

Abstract

This study analyzed the regional characteristics of raindrop size distribution (DSD) in the southern coastal area of South Korea. Data from March 2016 to February 2017 were recorded by four PARSIVEL disdrometers installed at intervals of ~20 km from the coastline to inland. Within 20 km from the coastline, multiple local maxima in the probability density function (PDF) were observed at Dm (mass-weighted drop diameter) = 0.6 mm and logNw (normalized intercept parameter) = 5.2 for stratiform rainfall, but these features were not observed more than 20 km from the coastline. Based on mean Dm–logNw values, stratiform rainfall clearly differed between coastal and inland areas. For convective precipitation, there was a linear relationship between Dm and Nw with the distance from the coastline. PDF analyses of diurnal variation in DSD confirmed that in spring and autumn the multiple local maxima appear in the daytime. The multiple local maxima in Dm (logNw) values were lower (higher) at nighttime (NT) than DT in the spring and summer season. These features were highly dependent on the prevailing wind. There was a pattern of increasing A and decreasing b in the radar reflectivity–rainfall rate (ZR) relationship (Z = ARb) with distance from the coastline, and these features were more pronounced in convective precipitation. These diurnal variabilities were regular in stratiform rainfall, and there were large differences in quantitative precipitation estimation depending on the land–sea breeze in the coastal area.

Corresponding Author: Dr. Dong-In Lee (leedi@pknu.ac.kr)
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