A Radio-Controlled Aircraft to Investigate Atmospheric Turbulence

Vitaly P. Kukharets Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia

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L. R. Tsvang Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia

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Abstract

A radio-controlled aircraft model to investigate atmospheric turbulence is described. The model with an airspeed of 20–40 m s−1 in the height range between 5 and 550 m and the flight time up to 30 min was equipped to carry a useful load weighing as much as 1 kg. The action radius of both the control and information transmission systems was up to 2 km. The sensing elements of both thermometer and hot-wire anemometer were mounted on the fuselage nose; their electronic blocks, a coding device, a radio transmitter, and batteries were installed in the fuselage of the aircraft.

The results of the synchronous measurements of the temperature and horizontal wind velocity component fluctuations in the surface layer by sensors installed on board the radio-controlled aircraft model and mounted on a mast were compared. Some results of the measurements of temperature fluctuations in the atmospheric surface layer are given.

This aircraft model can be effectively used in taking measurements over a surface with a complex relief, for example, over mountains or building structures.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Vitaly P. Kukharets, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS, Pyzhevsky 3, Moscow 109017, Russia.

Email: kuh@omega.ifaran.ru

Abstract

A radio-controlled aircraft model to investigate atmospheric turbulence is described. The model with an airspeed of 20–40 m s−1 in the height range between 5 and 550 m and the flight time up to 30 min was equipped to carry a useful load weighing as much as 1 kg. The action radius of both the control and information transmission systems was up to 2 km. The sensing elements of both thermometer and hot-wire anemometer were mounted on the fuselage nose; their electronic blocks, a coding device, a radio transmitter, and batteries were installed in the fuselage of the aircraft.

The results of the synchronous measurements of the temperature and horizontal wind velocity component fluctuations in the surface layer by sensors installed on board the radio-controlled aircraft model and mounted on a mast were compared. Some results of the measurements of temperature fluctuations in the atmospheric surface layer are given.

This aircraft model can be effectively used in taking measurements over a surface with a complex relief, for example, over mountains or building structures.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Vitaly P. Kukharets, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS, Pyzhevsky 3, Moscow 109017, Russia.

Email: kuh@omega.ifaran.ru

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