Use of Single-Ping Bottom-Track ADCP Data to Characterize Small-Scale Bathymetry

Clifford L. Trump Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.

Search for other papers by Clifford L. Trump in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
and
George O. Marmorino Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.

Search for other papers by George O. Marmorino in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Abstract

A shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler, in its bottom-track mode, estimates the radial velocity of the transducer relative to the bottom and the range from the transducer to the bottom for each beam of each ping. These data, along with attitude data (pitch, roll, and heading), can be used to map the X, Y, and Z positions of the beam/bottom intercepts. This paper shows how these intercepts can then be used to characterize the size, shape, and orientation of small-scale bathymetric features. The method is applied to data collected over a field of sand waves located 40 km east–northeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, in 30 m of water. Forty-five sand waves were crossed. The sand waves were oriented in an east–west direction, had characteristic heights of 3 m, wavelengths of 230 m, and northern slopes steeper than southern slopes (e.g., 3.8% versus 2.4%). Some sand waves were sampled repeatedly and extended for several kilometers.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Clifford L. Trump, Code 7250, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375.

Email: trump@nrlfs1.nrl.navy.mil

Abstract

A shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler, in its bottom-track mode, estimates the radial velocity of the transducer relative to the bottom and the range from the transducer to the bottom for each beam of each ping. These data, along with attitude data (pitch, roll, and heading), can be used to map the X, Y, and Z positions of the beam/bottom intercepts. This paper shows how these intercepts can then be used to characterize the size, shape, and orientation of small-scale bathymetric features. The method is applied to data collected over a field of sand waves located 40 km east–northeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, in 30 m of water. Forty-five sand waves were crossed. The sand waves were oriented in an east–west direction, had characteristic heights of 3 m, wavelengths of 230 m, and northern slopes steeper than southern slopes (e.g., 3.8% versus 2.4%). Some sand waves were sampled repeatedly and extended for several kilometers.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Clifford L. Trump, Code 7250, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375.

Email: trump@nrlfs1.nrl.navy.mil

Save
  • Donato, T. F., F. Askari, G. O. Marmorino, C. L. Trump, and D. R. Lyzenga, 1997: Radar imaging of sand waves on the continental shelf east of Cape Hatteras, NC, USA. Cont. Shelf Res.,17, 989–1004.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Hunt, R. E., D. J. P. Swift, and H. Palmer, 1977: Constructional shelf topography, Diamond Shoals, North Carolina. Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull.,88, 299–311.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Marmorino, G. O., D. R. Thompson, C. L. Trump, H. C. Graber, and R. E. Carande, 1994: Water-mass interactions near Cape Hatteras studied with coordinated ship and airborne data measurements. Eos Trans. Amer. Geophys. Union,75 (Suppl.), 179.

  • Trump, C. L., 1997: Calculation of ADCP alignment offsets using single-beam velocity and depth data. J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol.,14, 1252–1255.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • ——, and G. O. Marmorino, 1997: Calibrating a gyro compass using ADCP and DGPS data. J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol.,14, 211–214.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 307 75 8
PDF Downloads 253 51 11