• Blumberg, A., and G. L. Mellor, 1987: A description of a three-dimensional coastal ocean circulation model. Three Dimensional Coastal Models, N. S. Heaps, Ed., Amer. Geophys. Union, 1–16.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Choi, B. H., 1986: Tidal computations for the Yellow Sea. Proc. 20th Coastal Engineering Conf., Taipei, Taiwan, ASCE, 67–81.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • ——, 1989: A fine-grid three-dimensional M2 tidal model of the East China Sea. Modeling Marine Systems, A. M. Davies, Ed., Vol. 2, CRC Press, 167–185.

  • Galperin, B., L. H. Kantha, S. Hassid, and A. Rosati, 1988: A quasi-equilibrium turbulent energy model for geophysical flows. J. Atmos. Sci.,45, 55–62.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Mellor, G. L., and T. Yamada, 1982: A hierarchy of turbulence closure models for planetary boundary layers. J. Atmos. Sci.,31, 1791–1896.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • National Geophysical Data Center, 1985: Worldwide gridded bathymetry DBDB5 5-min latitude/longitude grid. Data Announcement 85-MGG-01, NOAA/NGDC, Boulder, CO, 75 pp. [Available from NOAA, NGDC, 325 Broadway, E/GC3, Boulder, CO 80303.].

  • Shulman, I., 1997: Local data assimilation in specification of open boundary conditions. J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol.,14, 1409–1419.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • ——, and J. Lewis, 1994: Modeling open boundary conditions by using the optimization approach. Center for Ocean and Atmosph. Modeling, University of Southern Mississippi, TR-1/95, 13 pp. [Available from Institute of Marine Sciences, USM, Bldg. 1103, Room 249, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529.].

  • ——, and ——, 1995: Optimization approach to the treatment of open boundary conditions. J. Phys. Oceanogr.,25, 1006–1011.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • ——, and ——, 1996: Optimized boundary conditions for coastal modeling. Estuarine and Coastal Modeling, Proc. ASCE 4th Int. Conf. San Diego, CA, ASCE, 268–282.

  • Smagorinsky, J., 1963: General circulation experiments with the primitive equations. Part I: The basic experiment. Mon. Wea. Rev.,91, 99–164.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 172 18 1
PDF Downloads 23 12 0

Optimized Boundary Conditions and Data Assimilation with Application to the M2 Tide in the Yellow Sea

View More View Less
  • 1 Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, Mississippi
  • | 2 Ocean Physics Research and Development, Long Beach, Mississippi
  • | 3 HydroQual, Inc., Mahwah, New Jersey
Restricted access

Abstract

An optimization approach is derived for assimilating tidal height information along the open boundaries of a numerical model. The approach is then extended so that similar data along transects inside a model domain can also be optimally assimilated. To test the application of such an optimized methodology, M2 tidal simulations were conducted with a numerical ocean model of the Yellow Sea, an area with a strong tidal influence. The use of the optimized open boundary conditions and internal data assimilation leads to a significant improvement of the predictive skill of the model. Average errors can be reduced by up to 75% when compared to nonoptimized boundary conditions.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Igor Shulman, Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Southern Mississippi, Building 1103, Rm. 249, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529-9904.

Email: ims@coam.usm.edu

Abstract

An optimization approach is derived for assimilating tidal height information along the open boundaries of a numerical model. The approach is then extended so that similar data along transects inside a model domain can also be optimally assimilated. To test the application of such an optimized methodology, M2 tidal simulations were conducted with a numerical ocean model of the Yellow Sea, an area with a strong tidal influence. The use of the optimized open boundary conditions and internal data assimilation leads to a significant improvement of the predictive skill of the model. Average errors can be reduced by up to 75% when compared to nonoptimized boundary conditions.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Igor Shulman, Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Southern Mississippi, Building 1103, Rm. 249, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529-9904.

Email: ims@coam.usm.edu

Save