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An Isotropic Light Sensor for Measurements of Visible Actinic Flux in Clouds

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  • 1 Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands
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Abstract

A low-cost isotropic light sensor is described consisting of a spherical diffuser connected to a single photodiode by a light conductor. The directional response to light is isotropic to a high degree. The small, lightweight, and rugged construction makes this instrument suitable not only for application on aircraft or under balloons but also on the ground in microclimatological studies.

A vertical profile of actinic flux in the visible range (400–750 nm) in Arctic stratus, obtained with this instrument under a tethered balloon during the FIRE experiment in 1998, is presented.

Corresponding author address: Dr. J. C. H. van der Hage, Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Utrecht University, Post Bus 80.005, 3508 TA Utrecht, Netherlands.

Email: J.C.H.vanderHage@phys.uu.nl

Abstract

A low-cost isotropic light sensor is described consisting of a spherical diffuser connected to a single photodiode by a light conductor. The directional response to light is isotropic to a high degree. The small, lightweight, and rugged construction makes this instrument suitable not only for application on aircraft or under balloons but also on the ground in microclimatological studies.

A vertical profile of actinic flux in the visible range (400–750 nm) in Arctic stratus, obtained with this instrument under a tethered balloon during the FIRE experiment in 1998, is presented.

Corresponding author address: Dr. J. C. H. van der Hage, Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Utrecht University, Post Bus 80.005, 3508 TA Utrecht, Netherlands.

Email: J.C.H.vanderHage@phys.uu.nl

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