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The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Radars: Operational Modes

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  • * Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
  • | + NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado
  • | # Department of Meteorology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
  • | @ Batelle, Pacific Northwest Nationl Laboratory, Richland, Washington
  • | 5 Division of Applied Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York
  • | * *Atmospheric Science Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California
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Abstract

During the past decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, has supported the development of several millimeter-wavelength radars for the study of clouds. This effort has culminated in the development and construction of a 35-GHz radar system by the Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Radar systems based on the NOAA ETL design are now operating at the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains central facility in central Oklahoma and the DOE ARM North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow, Alaska. Operational systems are expected to come online within the next year at the DOE ARM tropical western Pacific sites located at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Nauru. In order for these radars to detect the full range of atmospheric hydrometeors, specific modes of operation must be implemented on them that are tuned to accurately detect the reflectivities of specific types of hydrometeors. The set of four operational modes that are currently in use on these radars are presented and discussed. The characteristics of the data produced by these modes of operation are also presented in order to illustrate the nature of the cloud products that are, and will be, derived from them on a continuous basis.

Corresponding author address: Eugene E. Clothiaux, Department of Meteorology, 503 Walker Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.

Email: cloth@essc.psu.edu

Abstract

During the past decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, has supported the development of several millimeter-wavelength radars for the study of clouds. This effort has culminated in the development and construction of a 35-GHz radar system by the Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Radar systems based on the NOAA ETL design are now operating at the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains central facility in central Oklahoma and the DOE ARM North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow, Alaska. Operational systems are expected to come online within the next year at the DOE ARM tropical western Pacific sites located at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Nauru. In order for these radars to detect the full range of atmospheric hydrometeors, specific modes of operation must be implemented on them that are tuned to accurately detect the reflectivities of specific types of hydrometeors. The set of four operational modes that are currently in use on these radars are presented and discussed. The characteristics of the data produced by these modes of operation are also presented in order to illustrate the nature of the cloud products that are, and will be, derived from them on a continuous basis.

Corresponding author address: Eugene E. Clothiaux, Department of Meteorology, 503 Walker Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.

Email: cloth@essc.psu.edu

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