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A New Portable Instrument for Continuous Measurement of Formaldehyde in Ambient Air

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  • 1 Research Centre Karlsruhe, Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research (IMK-IFU), Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany
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Abstract

A new instrument for the in situ measurement of formaldehyde with online concentration output was built on the base of the Hantzsch chemistry fluorimetric detection of formaldehyde in liquid phase. The instrument was specially designed for applications in a fast-changing environment, for example, in airborne research. Individual instrument components were optimized to reduce size, weight, and power consumption and to improve response time. The small size, battery-operated system was shown to reach good performance, stable sensitivity, and detection limits of <100 ppt for temperatures between 0° and 35°C during aircraft flight missions in field campaigns in the Italian Po Valley. The instrument proved its performance with formaldehyde mixing ratios ranging from 0.5 to 25 ppb.

Corresponding author address: Wolfgang Junkermann, Research Centre Karlsruhe, Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Kreuzeckbahnstr. 19, Garmisch-Partenkirchen 82467, Germany. Email: wolfgang.junkermann@imk.fzk.de

Abstract

A new instrument for the in situ measurement of formaldehyde with online concentration output was built on the base of the Hantzsch chemistry fluorimetric detection of formaldehyde in liquid phase. The instrument was specially designed for applications in a fast-changing environment, for example, in airborne research. Individual instrument components were optimized to reduce size, weight, and power consumption and to improve response time. The small size, battery-operated system was shown to reach good performance, stable sensitivity, and detection limits of <100 ppt for temperatures between 0° and 35°C during aircraft flight missions in field campaigns in the Italian Po Valley. The instrument proved its performance with formaldehyde mixing ratios ranging from 0.5 to 25 ppb.

Corresponding author address: Wolfgang Junkermann, Research Centre Karlsruhe, Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Kreuzeckbahnstr. 19, Garmisch-Partenkirchen 82467, Germany. Email: wolfgang.junkermann@imk.fzk.de

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