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Calibrating the Spatial Response of Bio-Optical Sensors

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  • 1 Rockland Oceanographic Services Inc., Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
  • | 2 Department of Ocean Sciences, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo, Japan
  • | 3 Alec Electronics Co. Ltd., Kobe, Japan
  • | 4 School of Earth and Ocean Science, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
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Abstract

This article describes an experimental method used to establish the spatial wavenumber response of in situ fluorometers. The method is applied to a fluorometer developed to measure the structure of the fluorescence field at high spatial wavenumbers. This fluorometer detects fluorescence variations on centimeter scales by creating a sampling volume in the undisturbed flow region, outside of the sensor housing. The sampling volume is created by intersecting beams of blue excitation light. To establish the size of the sampling volume and the amount of spatial averaging, the fluorometer and a fast response thermistor are towed repeatedly through a warm, fluorescent plume in a tow tank. The ratio of the measured fluorescence and temperature spectrum determines the wavenumber response of the fluorometer. The measured spectral ratio is well described by the transfer function of a first-order, low-pass filter with a half-power point at 22 cpm. The equivalent spatial resolution is 7 mm. The transfer function model can be used to correct measured fluorescence spectra for the limited wavenumber response of the sensor.

Corresponding author address: Fabian Wolk, Rockland Oceanographic Services Inc., 1112 Reno St., Victoria, BC V9A 4B6, Canada. Email: Fabian@rocklandocean.com

Abstract

This article describes an experimental method used to establish the spatial wavenumber response of in situ fluorometers. The method is applied to a fluorometer developed to measure the structure of the fluorescence field at high spatial wavenumbers. This fluorometer detects fluorescence variations on centimeter scales by creating a sampling volume in the undisturbed flow region, outside of the sensor housing. The sampling volume is created by intersecting beams of blue excitation light. To establish the size of the sampling volume and the amount of spatial averaging, the fluorometer and a fast response thermistor are towed repeatedly through a warm, fluorescent plume in a tow tank. The ratio of the measured fluorescence and temperature spectrum determines the wavenumber response of the fluorometer. The measured spectral ratio is well described by the transfer function of a first-order, low-pass filter with a half-power point at 22 cpm. The equivalent spatial resolution is 7 mm. The transfer function model can be used to correct measured fluorescence spectra for the limited wavenumber response of the sensor.

Corresponding author address: Fabian Wolk, Rockland Oceanographic Services Inc., 1112 Reno St., Victoria, BC V9A 4B6, Canada. Email: Fabian@rocklandocean.com

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