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A Method for Processing Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Velocity Data from Towed, Undulating Vehicles

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  • 1 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon
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Abstract

The utility of the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) for sampling small time and space scales of coastal environments can be enhanced by mounting a high-frequency (1200 kHz) ADCP on an oscillating towed body. This approach requires both an external reference to convert the measured shears to velocities in the earth coordinates and a method to determine the towed body velocities. During the River Influence on the Shelf Ecosystems (RISE) project cruise, a high-frequency (1200 kHz) and narrowbeam ADCP with mode 12 sampling was mounted on a TRIAXUS oscillating towfish, which steers a 3D path behind the ship. This deployment approach extended the vertical range of the ADCP and allowed it to sample near-surface waters outside the ship’s wake. The measurements from a ship-mounted 1200-kHz narrowbeam ADCP are used as references for TRIAXUS ADCP data, and a method of overlapping bins is employed to recover the entire vertical range of the TRIAXUS ADCP. The TRIAXUS vehicle horizontal velocities are obtained by removing the derived ocean current velocity from the TRIAXUS ADCP measurements. The results show that the method is practical.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Jiayi Pan, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97201. Email: panj@cecs.pdx.edu

Abstract

The utility of the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) for sampling small time and space scales of coastal environments can be enhanced by mounting a high-frequency (1200 kHz) ADCP on an oscillating towed body. This approach requires both an external reference to convert the measured shears to velocities in the earth coordinates and a method to determine the towed body velocities. During the River Influence on the Shelf Ecosystems (RISE) project cruise, a high-frequency (1200 kHz) and narrowbeam ADCP with mode 12 sampling was mounted on a TRIAXUS oscillating towfish, which steers a 3D path behind the ship. This deployment approach extended the vertical range of the ADCP and allowed it to sample near-surface waters outside the ship’s wake. The measurements from a ship-mounted 1200-kHz narrowbeam ADCP are used as references for TRIAXUS ADCP data, and a method of overlapping bins is employed to recover the entire vertical range of the TRIAXUS ADCP. The TRIAXUS vehicle horizontal velocities are obtained by removing the derived ocean current velocity from the TRIAXUS ADCP measurements. The results show that the method is practical.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Jiayi Pan, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97201. Email: panj@cecs.pdx.edu

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