FURTHER ACOUSTICAL STUDIES OF ATMOSPHERIC WINDS AND TEMPERATURES AT ELEVATIONS OF 30 TO 60 KILOMETERS

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  • 1 University of Denver
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Abstract

Work under this project was divided into three phases of field operations. The first and second phases of operation were performed in Colorado and were directed toward a study of the annual variations of winds and temperatures in the 30- to 60-kilometer region. The third phase of operation was performed in New Mexico, as part of Air Force Operation T-Day, and was directed toward a study of the diurnal variations of winds and temperatures in the 30- to 60-km region. Results of the second-phase Colorado work are discussed along with results of Operation T-Day. Results and conclusions of the first-phase Colorado work have been presented in an earlier paper and are only briefly discussed here. During the second-phase Colorado studies (31 October 1951 through 28 August 1952), approximately one measurement of high-altitude winds and temperatures was made per month. Operations were centered approximately at 39°N, 103°40′W (near Limon, Colorado), and extended radially about 200 km. This study was a continuation of the first-phase work and was performed for the purpose of checking previous conclusions. Although acceptable agreement with earlier conclusions was generally found, no valid statistical comparison could be affected because of limitations of the data. However, the observed tendency of the wind vector to move clockwise as the season advanced was confirmed. Ten measurements of upper-atmosphere winds and temperatures were made as part of Air Force Operation T-Day during the period 20 to 24 October 1952. A study of results obtained showed that upper-atmosphere temperatures increased as the winds decreased with the advance of time of day through the daylight hours. Minimum temperatures and maximum winds occurred about 1000 MST. The method of calculation employed was generally that synthesized and developed by A. P. Crary.

Abstract

Work under this project was divided into three phases of field operations. The first and second phases of operation were performed in Colorado and were directed toward a study of the annual variations of winds and temperatures in the 30- to 60-kilometer region. The third phase of operation was performed in New Mexico, as part of Air Force Operation T-Day, and was directed toward a study of the diurnal variations of winds and temperatures in the 30- to 60-km region. Results of the second-phase Colorado work are discussed along with results of Operation T-Day. Results and conclusions of the first-phase Colorado work have been presented in an earlier paper and are only briefly discussed here. During the second-phase Colorado studies (31 October 1951 through 28 August 1952), approximately one measurement of high-altitude winds and temperatures was made per month. Operations were centered approximately at 39°N, 103°40′W (near Limon, Colorado), and extended radially about 200 km. This study was a continuation of the first-phase work and was performed for the purpose of checking previous conclusions. Although acceptable agreement with earlier conclusions was generally found, no valid statistical comparison could be affected because of limitations of the data. However, the observed tendency of the wind vector to move clockwise as the season advanced was confirmed. Ten measurements of upper-atmosphere winds and temperatures were made as part of Air Force Operation T-Day during the period 20 to 24 October 1952. A study of results obtained showed that upper-atmosphere temperatures increased as the winds decreased with the advance of time of day through the daylight hours. Minimum temperatures and maximum winds occurred about 1000 MST. The method of calculation employed was generally that synthesized and developed by A. P. Crary.

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