A PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE DESIGN OF A COMPUTER FOR MICROMETEOROLOGY

M. H. Halstead Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas

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Robert L. Richman Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas

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Winton Covey Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas

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Jerry D. Merryman Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas

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Abstract

Since all micrometeorological parameters must be uniquely determined by the macrometeorological parameters and the characteristics of the underlying surface, it should be possible to predict the former from a knowledge of the latter two. Unfortunately, both a lack of knowledge and the extreme complexity of the interrelationships involved have deterred the solution of this problem.

The present article describes an attempt at a solution for the simple case of a large plain, and gives in detail the physical relationships, the empirically determined constants, and the physical mechanism employed, together with a discussion of limitations of the present equipment.

Further, it is noted that since the energy and water fluxes at the earth-atmosphere interface form boundary conditions for the atmosphere, the ability to handle them readily should prove valuable in the solution of macrometeorological problems.

Abstract

Since all micrometeorological parameters must be uniquely determined by the macrometeorological parameters and the characteristics of the underlying surface, it should be possible to predict the former from a knowledge of the latter two. Unfortunately, both a lack of knowledge and the extreme complexity of the interrelationships involved have deterred the solution of this problem.

The present article describes an attempt at a solution for the simple case of a large plain, and gives in detail the physical relationships, the empirically determined constants, and the physical mechanism employed, together with a discussion of limitations of the present equipment.

Further, it is noted that since the energy and water fluxes at the earth-atmosphere interface form boundary conditions for the atmosphere, the ability to handle them readily should prove valuable in the solution of macrometeorological problems.

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