BUDGETS OF SEVERAL ENVIRONMENTS UNDER SEA-BREEZE ADVECTION IN WESTERN OREGON

William P. Lowry Oregon Forest Lands Research Center, Corvallis, Oregon

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Abstract

In order to provide basic information on micrometeorology as related to forest-fire weather and forest regeneration, a series of measurements was made in the central Oregon Coast Range. Net radiation flux, soil heat storage, and evaporation were calculated from observations, while turbulent flux was considered the residual of these three. Based on published energy-budget data from situations in which advection was considered absent, an estimate was made of what the turbulent flux would have been at these Oregon stations in the absence of the sea breeze. Differences between these hypothetical values and the observed values are termed the “total advection effect” and are separated into vertical and horizontal components.

Abstract

In order to provide basic information on micrometeorology as related to forest-fire weather and forest regeneration, a series of measurements was made in the central Oregon Coast Range. Net radiation flux, soil heat storage, and evaporation were calculated from observations, while turbulent flux was considered the residual of these three. Based on published energy-budget data from situations in which advection was considered absent, an estimate was made of what the turbulent flux would have been at these Oregon stations in the absence of the sea breeze. Differences between these hypothetical values and the observed values are termed the “total advection effect” and are separated into vertical and horizontal components.

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