All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 125 19 0
PDF Downloads 23 16 0

Further Evidence of Sunspot-Ozone Relationships

View More View Less
  • 1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Restricted access

Abstract

It is shown that previous evidence of a high cyclical correlation between total atmospheric ozone and relative sunspot number on the one hand, and the mean latitude of the total area of solar spottedness on the other hand, cannot he explained away by the seasonal, geographical and chronological non-homogeneity of the total ozone data. The same basic relationships are found with only little reduction of significance in the data of the only two stations of relatively complete record, and in calendar seasonal and even monthly data. Further investigation shows that the relationship to sunspot latitude is not continuous, but that the ozone stimulating effect of sunspots apparently is cut off rather sharply when the mean latitude of solar spottedness moves poleward of about 12°.

By analysis of the ozone data separately for the months February, March, August and September when the earth is farthest from the solar equator and for the months May, June, November and December when it is closest, Rasool has found further evidence of a rather sharp cutoff of the ozone stimulating effect of sunspots when the earth lies outside of a sunspot cone of some 15° radius.

Abstract

It is shown that previous evidence of a high cyclical correlation between total atmospheric ozone and relative sunspot number on the one hand, and the mean latitude of the total area of solar spottedness on the other hand, cannot he explained away by the seasonal, geographical and chronological non-homogeneity of the total ozone data. The same basic relationships are found with only little reduction of significance in the data of the only two stations of relatively complete record, and in calendar seasonal and even monthly data. Further investigation shows that the relationship to sunspot latitude is not continuous, but that the ozone stimulating effect of sunspots apparently is cut off rather sharply when the mean latitude of solar spottedness moves poleward of about 12°.

By analysis of the ozone data separately for the months February, March, August and September when the earth is farthest from the solar equator and for the months May, June, November and December when it is closest, Rasool has found further evidence of a rather sharp cutoff of the ozone stimulating effect of sunspots when the earth lies outside of a sunspot cone of some 15° radius.

Save