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An Analytical and Numerical Study of the Martian Planetary Boundary Layer Over Slopes

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  • 1 Depts. Of Mathematics and Meteorology, and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Institute, Florida State University, Tallahassee 32306
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Abstract

A one-dimensional model of the Martian planetary boundary layer over sloping terrain is analyzed under a variety of conditions. Analytical results for the steady and diurnal components of the temperature and wind fields are found when a Boussinesq model with a Newtonian cooling law is considered. These results form a basis for understanding the numerical results which include more realistic representations for the heating and parameterizations for the eddy transfer of momentum and beat. The diurnal boundary layer thickness is determined primarily by radiative processes and the amplitudes of the wind and temperature oscillations are found to depend in an important way on the latitude and slope magnitude. Typically, oscillations in the temperature of ±15K and in the upslope wind of ±25m sec −1 are found 1 km above a Martian slope of 0.005.

Abstract

A one-dimensional model of the Martian planetary boundary layer over sloping terrain is analyzed under a variety of conditions. Analytical results for the steady and diurnal components of the temperature and wind fields are found when a Boussinesq model with a Newtonian cooling law is considered. These results form a basis for understanding the numerical results which include more realistic representations for the heating and parameterizations for the eddy transfer of momentum and beat. The diurnal boundary layer thickness is determined primarily by radiative processes and the amplitudes of the wind and temperature oscillations are found to depend in an important way on the latitude and slope magnitude. Typically, oscillations in the temperature of ±15K and in the upslope wind of ±25m sec −1 are found 1 km above a Martian slope of 0.005.

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