Molecular Studies of the Ice-Forming Capabilities of Different Surfaces

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  • 1 Leningrad Hydrometerological Institute, Leningrad, USSR
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Abstract

The objective of the present study was to determine the nature of ice-forming capabilities of different chemical compounds, whose effectiveness is determined by the character of the forces binding water molecules to the surface of the compound. Adsorption layers of water and ammonia on the salts of silver and lead were studied. Dependence between the surface properties and ice-forming capabilities of the chemical compounds were investigated. Direct molecular structural analysis by infrared spectroscopy and nuclear-magnetic resonance were used in those studies.

An active nucleus whose surface stimulates the water-to-ice phase transition for water molecules condensed on it must have a hydrophobic matrix with open structure and centers capable of interacting with water molecules.

There seem to be two reasonable ways of artificially modifying a surface with the objective of stimulating the water-to-ice phase transition of condensed water: (1) contamination of the hydrophobic surface with active centers, which can interact with water molecules, or (2) suppression or removal of part of the active centers of a hydrophilic surface.

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to determine the nature of ice-forming capabilities of different chemical compounds, whose effectiveness is determined by the character of the forces binding water molecules to the surface of the compound. Adsorption layers of water and ammonia on the salts of silver and lead were studied. Dependence between the surface properties and ice-forming capabilities of the chemical compounds were investigated. Direct molecular structural analysis by infrared spectroscopy and nuclear-magnetic resonance were used in those studies.

An active nucleus whose surface stimulates the water-to-ice phase transition for water molecules condensed on it must have a hydrophobic matrix with open structure and centers capable of interacting with water molecules.

There seem to be two reasonable ways of artificially modifying a surface with the objective of stimulating the water-to-ice phase transition of condensed water: (1) contamination of the hydrophobic surface with active centers, which can interact with water molecules, or (2) suppression or removal of part of the active centers of a hydrophilic surface.

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