Evolution of the Subtropical Marine Boundary Layer: Photochemical Ozone Loss

I. R. Paluch National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

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S. McKeen National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, Colorado

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D. H. Lenschow National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

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R. D. Schillawski National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

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G. L. Kok National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

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Abstract

A diurnally averaged ozone decay rate of about 0.11 day−1was observed under partly cloudy sky in the boundary layer over the eastern Atlantic during the second Lagrangian experiment in the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment. The observed decay rate can be accounted for by the combined effects of ozone loss through photolysis by UV radiation, reaction With H02 radical, and deposition on the sea surface, and effects of ozone production through photooxidation of carbon monoxide and methane in the presence of nitrogen oxides. The main contributor to the ozone decay is photolysis by UV radiation, but the other sources and sinks also make significant contributions.

Abstract

A diurnally averaged ozone decay rate of about 0.11 day−1was observed under partly cloudy sky in the boundary layer over the eastern Atlantic during the second Lagrangian experiment in the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment. The observed decay rate can be accounted for by the combined effects of ozone loss through photolysis by UV radiation, reaction With H02 radical, and deposition on the sea surface, and effects of ozone production through photooxidation of carbon monoxide and methane in the presence of nitrogen oxides. The main contributor to the ozone decay is photolysis by UV radiation, but the other sources and sinks also make significant contributions.

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