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The Next-Order Corrections to Quasigeostrophic Theory

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  • 1 Courant Institute, New York University, New York, New York
  • | 2 National Center for Atmospheric Research,* Boulder, Colorado
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Abstract

Quasigeostrophic theory is an approximation of the primitive equations in which the dynamics of geostrophically balanced motions are described by the advection of potential vorticity. Quasigeostrophy also represents a leading-order theory in the sense that it is derivable from the full primitive equations in the asymptotic limit of zero Rossby number. Building upon quasigeostrophy, and the centrality of potential vorticity, a systematic asymptotic framework is developed from which balanced, next-order corrections in Rossby number are obtained. The simplicity of the approach is illustrated by explicit construction of the next-order corrections to a finite-amplitude Eady edge wave.

Corresponding author address: Dr. David J. Muraki, Courant Institute, New York University, New York, NY 10003.

Email: muraki@cims.nyu.edu

Abstract

Quasigeostrophic theory is an approximation of the primitive equations in which the dynamics of geostrophically balanced motions are described by the advection of potential vorticity. Quasigeostrophy also represents a leading-order theory in the sense that it is derivable from the full primitive equations in the asymptotic limit of zero Rossby number. Building upon quasigeostrophy, and the centrality of potential vorticity, a systematic asymptotic framework is developed from which balanced, next-order corrections in Rossby number are obtained. The simplicity of the approach is illustrated by explicit construction of the next-order corrections to a finite-amplitude Eady edge wave.

Corresponding author address: Dr. David J. Muraki, Courant Institute, New York University, New York, NY 10003.

Email: muraki@cims.nyu.edu

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