• Anwender, D., , P. A. Harr, , and S. C. Jones, 2008: Predictability associated with the downstream impacts of the extratropical transition of tropical cyclones: Case studies. Mon. Wea. Rev., 136 , 32263247.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Baldauf, M., 2008: Stability analysis for linear discretisations of the advection equation with Runge–Kutta time integration. J. Comput. Phys., 227 , 66386659.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bell, G. I., 1990: Interaction between vortices and waves in a simple model of geophysical flow. Phys. Fluids, 2A , 575586. doi:10.1063/1.857757.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bosart, L. F., , and G. M. Lackmann, 1995: Postlandfall tropical cyclone reintensification in a weakly baroclinic environment: A case study of Hurricane David (September 1979). Mon. Wea. Rev., 123 , 32683291.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Harr, P. A., , and J. M. Dea, 2009: Downstream development associated with the extratropical transition of tropical cyclones over the western North Pacific. Mon. Wea. Rev., 137 , 12951319.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Harr, P. A., , D. Anwender, , and S. C. Jones, 2008: Predictability associated with the downstream impacts of the extratropical transition of tropical cyclones: Methodology and a case study of Typhoon Nabi (2005). Mon. Wea. Rev., 136 , 32053225.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Henderson, J. M., , G. M. Lackmann, , and J. R. Gyakum, 1999: An analysis of Hurricane Opal’s forecast track errors using quasigeostrophic potential vorticity inversion. Mon. Wea. Rev., 127 , 292307.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Jones, S. C., 1995: The evolution of vortices in vertical shear. I: Initially barotropic vortices. Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc., 121 , 821851. doi:10.1002/qj.49712152406.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Melander, M. V., , J. C. McWilliams, , and N. J. Zabusky, 1987: Axisymmetrization and vorticity-gradient intensification of an isolated two-dimensional vortex through filamentation. J. Fluid Mech., 178 , 137159. doi:10.1017/S0022112087001150.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Press, W. H., , B. P. Flannery, , S. A. Teukolsky, , and W. T. Vetterling, 1986: Numerical Recipes. Cambridge University Press, 1235 pp.

  • Riemer, M., , and S. C. Jones, 2010: The downstream impact of tropical cyclones on a developing baroclinic wave in idealized scenarios of extratropical transition. Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc., 136 , 617637. doi:10.1002/qj.605.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Riemer, M., , S. C. Jones, , and C. A. Davis, 2008: The impact of extratropical transition on the downstream flow: An idealized modelling study with a straight jet. Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc., 134 , 6991. doi:10.1002/qj.189.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Scheck, L., , S. C. Jones, , and M. Juckes, 2011: The resonant interaction of a tropical cyclone and a tropopause front in a barotropic model. Part II: Frontal waves. J. Atmos. Sci., 68 , 420429.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Schwierz, C., , S. Dirren, , and H. C. Davies, 2004: Forced waves on a zonally aligned jet stream. J. Atmos. Sci., 61 , 7387.

  • Smith, R. K., , W. Ulrich, , and G. Dietachmayer, 1990: A numerical study of tropical cyclone motion using a barotropic model. I: The role of vortex asymmetries. Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc., 116 , 337362. doi:10.1002/qj.49711649206.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Vallis, G. A., 2006: Atmospheric and Ocean Fluid Dynamics. Cambridge University Press, 745 pp.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 17 17 2
PDF Downloads 7 7 1

The Resonant Interaction of a Tropical Cyclone and a Tropopause Front in a Barotropic Model. Part I: Zonally Oriented Front

View More View Less
  • 1 Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
  • | 2 British Atmospheric Data Centre, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, United Kingdom
© Get Permissions
Restricted access

Abstract

The interaction of a tropical cyclone and a zonally aligned tropopause front is investigated in an idealized framework. A nondivergent barotropic model is used in which the front is represented by a vorticity step, giving a jetlike velocity profile. The excitation of frontal waves by a cyclone located south of the front and the impact of the wave flow on the cyclone motion is studied for different representations of the cyclone and the jet. The evolution from the initial wave excitation until after the cyclone has crossed the front is discussed. The interaction becomes stronger with increasing jet speed. For cyclone representations containing negative relative vorticity, anticyclones develop and can influence the excitation of frontal waves significantly. Resonant frontal waves propagating with a phase speed matching the zonal translation speed of the cyclone are decisive for the interaction. The frontal wave spectrum excited by a cyclone on the front is dominated by waves that are in resonance in the initial phase. These waves have the largest impact on the cyclone motion.

Corresponding author address: Leonhard Scheck, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany. Email: leonhard.scheck@kit.edu

Abstract

The interaction of a tropical cyclone and a zonally aligned tropopause front is investigated in an idealized framework. A nondivergent barotropic model is used in which the front is represented by a vorticity step, giving a jetlike velocity profile. The excitation of frontal waves by a cyclone located south of the front and the impact of the wave flow on the cyclone motion is studied for different representations of the cyclone and the jet. The evolution from the initial wave excitation until after the cyclone has crossed the front is discussed. The interaction becomes stronger with increasing jet speed. For cyclone representations containing negative relative vorticity, anticyclones develop and can influence the excitation of frontal waves significantly. Resonant frontal waves propagating with a phase speed matching the zonal translation speed of the cyclone are decisive for the interaction. The frontal wave spectrum excited by a cyclone on the front is dominated by waves that are in resonance in the initial phase. These waves have the largest impact on the cyclone motion.

Corresponding author address: Leonhard Scheck, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany. Email: leonhard.scheck@kit.edu

Save