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  • 1 Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • | 2 Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
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In Wagner and Graf (2010, hereafter WG) we presented a convection parameterization based on the representation of 1) explicitly modeled individual cumulus clouds and 2) a cloud spectrum consisting of these different cumulus clouds. This approach was taken to address limitations of bulk mass flux parameterizations such as the incorporation of aerosol effects in convective clouds, mixed phase microphysics, and cloud coverage by convective clouds of different heights. The presented parameterization delivers realistic spectra of vertical velocities, precipitation intensities, entrainment and detrainment profiles, and cloud coverage, when compared to atmospheric measurements.

Plant and Yano (2011,

In Wagner and Graf (2010, hereafter WG) we presented a convection parameterization based on the representation of 1) explicitly modeled individual cumulus clouds and 2) a cloud spectrum consisting of these different cumulus clouds. This approach was taken to address limitations of bulk mass flux parameterizations such as the incorporation of aerosol effects in convective clouds, mixed phase microphysics, and cloud coverage by convective clouds of different heights. The presented parameterization delivers realistic spectra of vertical velocities, precipitation intensities, entrainment and detrainment profiles, and cloud coverage, when compared to atmospheric measurements.

Plant and Yano (2011,

Corresponding author address: Till M. Wagner, Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom. E-mail: till.wagner@physics.ox.ac.uk

The original article that was the subject of this comment/reply can be found at http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/2010JAS3485.1.

In Wagner and Graf (2010, hereafter WG) we presented a convection parameterization based on the representation of 1) explicitly modeled individual cumulus clouds and 2) a cloud spectrum consisting of these different cumulus clouds. This approach was taken to address limitations of bulk mass flux parameterizations such as the incorporation of aerosol effects in convective clouds, mixed phase microphysics, and cloud coverage by convective clouds of different heights. The presented parameterization delivers realistic spectra of vertical velocities, precipitation intensities, entrainment and detrainment profiles, and cloud coverage, when compared to atmospheric measurements.

Plant and Yano (2011,

In Wagner and Graf (2010, hereafter WG) we presented a convection parameterization based on the representation of 1) explicitly modeled individual cumulus clouds and 2) a cloud spectrum consisting of these different cumulus clouds. This approach was taken to address limitations of bulk mass flux parameterizations such as the incorporation of aerosol effects in convective clouds, mixed phase microphysics, and cloud coverage by convective clouds of different heights. The presented parameterization delivers realistic spectra of vertical velocities, precipitation intensities, entrainment and detrainment profiles, and cloud coverage, when compared to atmospheric measurements.

Plant and Yano (2011,

Corresponding author address: Till M. Wagner, Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom. E-mail: till.wagner@physics.ox.ac.uk

The original article that was the subject of this comment/reply can be found at http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/2010JAS3485.1.

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