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Modeling of Forecast Sensitivity on the March of Monsoon Isochrones from Kerala to New Delhi: The First 25 Days

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  • 1 Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, The Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida
  • | 2 New Delhi, India
  • | 3 Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • | 4 Centre for Atmosphere, Ocean Studies, IISC, Bangalore, India
  • | 5 NRL, Washington, D.C.
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Abstract

This study addresses observational and modeling sensitivity on the march of the onset isochrones of the Indian summer monsoon. The first 25 days of the passage of the isochrones of monsoon onset is of great scientific interest. Surface and satellite-based datasets are used for high-resolution modeling of the impact of the motion of the onset isochrones from Kerala to New Delhi. These include the asymmetries across the isochrone such as soil moisture and its temporal variability, moistening of the dry soil to the immediate north of the isochrone by nonconvective anvil rains, and formation of newly forming cloud elements to the immediate north of the isochrone. The region immediately north of the isochrone is shown to carry a spread of buoyancy elements. As these new elements grow, they are continually being steered by the divergent circulations of the parent isochrone to the north and eventually to the northwest. CloudSat was extremely useful for identifying the asymmetric cloud structures across the isochrone. In the modeling sensitivity studies, the authors used a mesoscale Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW-WRF) to examine days 1–25 of forecasts of the onset isochrone. Prediction experiments were first modeled during normal, dry, and wet Indian monsoons using default values of model parameters. This study was extended to determine the effects of changes in soil moisture and nonconvective rain parameterizations (the parameters suggested by the satellite observations). These sensitivity experiments show that the motion of the isochrones from Kerala to New Delhi are very sensitive to the parameterization of soil moisture and nonconvective anvil rains immediately north of the isochrone.

Corresponding author address: T. N. Krishnamurti, Dept. of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, The Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306. E-mail: tkrishnamurti@fsu.edu

Abstract

This study addresses observational and modeling sensitivity on the march of the onset isochrones of the Indian summer monsoon. The first 25 days of the passage of the isochrones of monsoon onset is of great scientific interest. Surface and satellite-based datasets are used for high-resolution modeling of the impact of the motion of the onset isochrones from Kerala to New Delhi. These include the asymmetries across the isochrone such as soil moisture and its temporal variability, moistening of the dry soil to the immediate north of the isochrone by nonconvective anvil rains, and formation of newly forming cloud elements to the immediate north of the isochrone. The region immediately north of the isochrone is shown to carry a spread of buoyancy elements. As these new elements grow, they are continually being steered by the divergent circulations of the parent isochrone to the north and eventually to the northwest. CloudSat was extremely useful for identifying the asymmetric cloud structures across the isochrone. In the modeling sensitivity studies, the authors used a mesoscale Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW-WRF) to examine days 1–25 of forecasts of the onset isochrone. Prediction experiments were first modeled during normal, dry, and wet Indian monsoons using default values of model parameters. This study was extended to determine the effects of changes in soil moisture and nonconvective rain parameterizations (the parameters suggested by the satellite observations). These sensitivity experiments show that the motion of the isochrones from Kerala to New Delhi are very sensitive to the parameterization of soil moisture and nonconvective anvil rains immediately north of the isochrone.

Corresponding author address: T. N. Krishnamurti, Dept. of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, The Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306. E-mail: tkrishnamurti@fsu.edu
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