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A Note on the Power Distribution between Symmetric and Antisymmetric Components of the Tropical Brightness Temperature Spectrum in the Wavenumber–Frequency Plane

Ofer ShamiraFredy and Nadine Herrmann Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel

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Chaim I. GarfinkelaFredy and Nadine Herrmann Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel

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Ori AdamaFredy and Nadine Herrmann Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel

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Nathan PaldoraFredy and Nadine Herrmann Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel

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Abstract

A recent study observed the existence of a salient bias toward the symmetric part of the tropical wavenumber–frequency spectrum. Examination of the tropical brightness temperature (BT) spectrum in this note shows that its parity difference, i.e., the difference between its symmetric and antisymmetric components, is concentrated in regions of the wavenumber–frequency plane corresponding to the spectral bands suggested by Wheeler and Kiladis. In terms of the difference between the spectral power in the symmetric and antisymmetric components, the spectral bands corresponding to Kelvin waves, Madden–Julian oscillation, and Rossby waves explain about 31%, 21%, and 13% of the symmetric bias, respectively, while the combined contribution of all the other bands is negligible. The “background” spectrum after filtering out all the spectral bands explains the remaining 35% of the symmetric bias. As these spectral bands were originally designed for filtering convectively coupled equatorial waves, the findings of this note may help estimate the contributions of different wave features to the symmetric bias in the tropical BT spectrum. In addition, these findings may also help better understand the processes responsible for generating the tropical background spectrum.

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Nathan Paldor, nathan.paldor@mail.huji.ac.il

Abstract

A recent study observed the existence of a salient bias toward the symmetric part of the tropical wavenumber–frequency spectrum. Examination of the tropical brightness temperature (BT) spectrum in this note shows that its parity difference, i.e., the difference between its symmetric and antisymmetric components, is concentrated in regions of the wavenumber–frequency plane corresponding to the spectral bands suggested by Wheeler and Kiladis. In terms of the difference between the spectral power in the symmetric and antisymmetric components, the spectral bands corresponding to Kelvin waves, Madden–Julian oscillation, and Rossby waves explain about 31%, 21%, and 13% of the symmetric bias, respectively, while the combined contribution of all the other bands is negligible. The “background” spectrum after filtering out all the spectral bands explains the remaining 35% of the symmetric bias. As these spectral bands were originally designed for filtering convectively coupled equatorial waves, the findings of this note may help estimate the contributions of different wave features to the symmetric bias in the tropical BT spectrum. In addition, these findings may also help better understand the processes responsible for generating the tropical background spectrum.

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Nathan Paldor, nathan.paldor@mail.huji.ac.il
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