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The Influence of Surface Heat Fluxes on the Growth of Idealized Monsoon Depressions

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  • 1 a Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California
  • | 2 b Climate and Ecosystem Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California
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Abstract

This study explores the effect of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes on monsoon depressions using a series of idealized convection-permitting simulations. Each experiment is initialized with a small-amplitude wave that is allowed to grow within an environment representative of the South Asian monsoon. Comparing experiments with and without interactive surface heat fluxes, it is found that these fluxes enhance the growth of the simulated vortices. Without interactive surface fluxes, the strengthening period is short and the vortices fail to reach intensities characteristic of stronger monsoon depressions. Using a large set of experiments in which the vertical and meridional shear are systematically varied, it is found that surface heat fluxes enhance intensity the most when the upper-level shear is weak, the lower-level shear and associated moist static energy (MSE) gradient are sufficiently steep, and the lower-level meridional shear is strong. These experiments reveal two different regimes of convection-coupled monsoon depression growth: one in which convection is driven by MSE advection and one in which it is driven by surface heat fluxes and quasigeostrophic forcing for ascent. Both regimes require sufficiently strong meridional shear to achieve initial growth by barotropic instability.

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Michael Diaz, mldiaz@ncsu.edu

Abstract

This study explores the effect of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes on monsoon depressions using a series of idealized convection-permitting simulations. Each experiment is initialized with a small-amplitude wave that is allowed to grow within an environment representative of the South Asian monsoon. Comparing experiments with and without interactive surface heat fluxes, it is found that these fluxes enhance the growth of the simulated vortices. Without interactive surface fluxes, the strengthening period is short and the vortices fail to reach intensities characteristic of stronger monsoon depressions. Using a large set of experiments in which the vertical and meridional shear are systematically varied, it is found that surface heat fluxes enhance intensity the most when the upper-level shear is weak, the lower-level shear and associated moist static energy (MSE) gradient are sufficiently steep, and the lower-level meridional shear is strong. These experiments reveal two different regimes of convection-coupled monsoon depression growth: one in which convection is driven by MSE advection and one in which it is driven by surface heat fluxes and quasigeostrophic forcing for ascent. Both regimes require sufficiently strong meridional shear to achieve initial growth by barotropic instability.

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Michael Diaz, mldiaz@ncsu.edu
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