Detecting Clouds Associated with Jet Engine Ice Crystal Icing

Julie Haggerty National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

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Eric Defer Laboratoire d’Aérologie, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, OMP, UPS, Toulouse, France

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Adrianus De Laat KNMI, de Bilt, Netherlands

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Kristopher Bedka NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia

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Jean-Marc Moisselin Météo-France, Toulouse, France

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Rodney Potts Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

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Julien Delanoë LATMOS, IPSL, UVSQ, Guyancourt, France

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Frédéric Parol Laboratoire d’Optique Atmosphérique, Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, CNRS, Lille, France

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Alice Grandin Airbus, SAS, Toulouse, France

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Stephanie Divito William J. Hughes Technical Center, Federal Aviation Administration, Atlantic City, New Jersey

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Abstract

In the past two decades, more than 150 jet engine power-loss and damage events have been attributed to a phenomenon known as ice crystal icing (ICI). Ingestion of large numbers of ice particles into the engine core are thought to be responsible for these events, which typically occur at high altitudes near large convective systems in tropical air masses. In recent years, scientists, engineers, aviation regulators, and airlines from around the world have collaborated to better understand the relevant meteorological processes associated with ICI events, solve critical engineering problems, develop new certification standards, and devise mitigation strategies for the aviation industry. One area of research is the development of nowcasting techniques based on available remote sensing technology and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models to identify areas of high ice water content (IWC) and enable the provision of alerts to the aviation industry. Multiple techniques have been developed using geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite products, NWP model fields, and ground-based radar data as the basis for high-IWC products. Targeted field experiments in tropical regions with high incidence of ICI events have provided data for product validation and refinement of these methods. Beginning in 2015, research teams have assembled at a series of annual workshops to exchange ideas and standardize methods for evaluating performance of high-IWC detection products. This paper provides an overview of the approaches used and the current skill for identifying high-IWC conditions. Recommendations for future work in this area are also presented.

© 2019 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Julie Haggerty, haggerty@ucar.edu

Abstract

In the past two decades, more than 150 jet engine power-loss and damage events have been attributed to a phenomenon known as ice crystal icing (ICI). Ingestion of large numbers of ice particles into the engine core are thought to be responsible for these events, which typically occur at high altitudes near large convective systems in tropical air masses. In recent years, scientists, engineers, aviation regulators, and airlines from around the world have collaborated to better understand the relevant meteorological processes associated with ICI events, solve critical engineering problems, develop new certification standards, and devise mitigation strategies for the aviation industry. One area of research is the development of nowcasting techniques based on available remote sensing technology and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models to identify areas of high ice water content (IWC) and enable the provision of alerts to the aviation industry. Multiple techniques have been developed using geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite products, NWP model fields, and ground-based radar data as the basis for high-IWC products. Targeted field experiments in tropical regions with high incidence of ICI events have provided data for product validation and refinement of these methods. Beginning in 2015, research teams have assembled at a series of annual workshops to exchange ideas and standardize methods for evaluating performance of high-IWC detection products. This paper provides an overview of the approaches used and the current skill for identifying high-IWC conditions. Recommendations for future work in this area are also presented.

© 2019 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Julie Haggerty, haggerty@ucar.edu
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