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Recommendations for Future Research Priorities for Climate Modeling and Climate Services

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  • 1 Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom, and University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia
  • | 2 European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, United Kingdom
  • | 3 Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  • | 4 Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt, Netherlands
  • | 5 Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Barcelona, Spain
  • | 6 ICREA, and Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Barcelona, Spain
  • | 7 Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, and Republic Hydrometeorological Service of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia
  • | 8 Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom
  • | 9 Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Norrköping, Sweden
  • | 10 Republic Hydrometeorological Service of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia
  • | 11 Climate Service Center Germany, Helmholtz Zentrum, Geesthacht, Germany
  • | 12 Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Barcelona, Spain
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Abstract

Climate observations, research, and models are used extensively to help understand key processes underlying changes to the climate on a range of time scales from months to decades, and to investigate and describe possible longer-term future climates. The knowledge generated serves as a scientific basis for climate services that are provided with the aim of tailoring information for decision-makers and policy-makers. Climate models and climate services are crucial elements for supporting policy and other societal actions to mitigate and adapt to climate change, and for making society better prepared and more resilient to climate-related risks. We present recommendations for future research topics for climate modeling and for climate services. These recommendations were produced by a group of experts in climate modeling and climate services, selected based on their individual leadership roles or participation in international activities. The recommendations were reached through extensive analysis, consideration and discussion of current and desired research capabilities, and wider engagement and refinement of the recommendations was achieved through a targeted workshop of initial recommendations and an open meeting at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly. The findings emphasize how research and innovation activities in the fields of climate modeling and climate services can contribute to improving climate knowledge and information with saliency for users in order to enhance capacity to transition to a sustainable and resilient society. The findings are relevant worldwide but are deliberately intended to influence the European Commission’s next major multi-annual framework program of research and innovation over the period 2021–27.

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Chris Hewitt, chris.hewitt@metoffice.gov.uk

Abstract

Climate observations, research, and models are used extensively to help understand key processes underlying changes to the climate on a range of time scales from months to decades, and to investigate and describe possible longer-term future climates. The knowledge generated serves as a scientific basis for climate services that are provided with the aim of tailoring information for decision-makers and policy-makers. Climate models and climate services are crucial elements for supporting policy and other societal actions to mitigate and adapt to climate change, and for making society better prepared and more resilient to climate-related risks. We present recommendations for future research topics for climate modeling and for climate services. These recommendations were produced by a group of experts in climate modeling and climate services, selected based on their individual leadership roles or participation in international activities. The recommendations were reached through extensive analysis, consideration and discussion of current and desired research capabilities, and wider engagement and refinement of the recommendations was achieved through a targeted workshop of initial recommendations and an open meeting at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly. The findings emphasize how research and innovation activities in the fields of climate modeling and climate services can contribute to improving climate knowledge and information with saliency for users in order to enhance capacity to transition to a sustainable and resilient society. The findings are relevant worldwide but are deliberately intended to influence the European Commission’s next major multi-annual framework program of research and innovation over the period 2021–27.

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Chris Hewitt, chris.hewitt@metoffice.gov.uk
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