A Pneumatically Actuated Icing Detector for Stationary Operation

R. C. Goettelman Stanford Research Institute

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I. G. Poppoff Stanford Research Institute

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An icing detector which operates on a pressurized air system and utilizes the pressure drop produced across a Venturi tube as an indication of icing conditions is described in this paper. Since the rate of ice formation on a surface is a function of the configuration of the surface, this detector has the unique advantage of being adaptable to conform with the shape of any structure on which it is mounted. Previously developed icing detectors require either a high velocity air stream, as in aircraft operation, or moving parts subject to possible mechanical failure during severe icing conditions. A pneumatically actuated icing detector designed specifically for stationary operation would be capable of icing measurements without either of these restrictions. Preliminary experiments indicate that this technique is feasible and capable of furnishing quantitative measurements of icing severity.

1 The work described in this paper was performed as a part of Contract AF 30 (602)-1442 with the Rome Air Development Center, Air Force Research and Development Command, Griffiss Air Force Base, Rome, New York.

An icing detector which operates on a pressurized air system and utilizes the pressure drop produced across a Venturi tube as an indication of icing conditions is described in this paper. Since the rate of ice formation on a surface is a function of the configuration of the surface, this detector has the unique advantage of being adaptable to conform with the shape of any structure on which it is mounted. Previously developed icing detectors require either a high velocity air stream, as in aircraft operation, or moving parts subject to possible mechanical failure during severe icing conditions. A pneumatically actuated icing detector designed specifically for stationary operation would be capable of icing measurements without either of these restrictions. Preliminary experiments indicate that this technique is feasible and capable of furnishing quantitative measurements of icing severity.

1 The work described in this paper was performed as a part of Contract AF 30 (602)-1442 with the Rome Air Development Center, Air Force Research and Development Command, Griffiss Air Force Base, Rome, New York.

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