A Solar Time Classification for Meteorological Use

Irving A. Singer Brookhaven National Laboratory

Search for other papers by Irving A. Singer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
and
Gilbert S. Raynor Brookhaven National Laboratory

Search for other papers by Gilbert S. Raynor in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

In order to effect a more consistent grouping of hourly meteorological data influenced by the diurnal cycle, a chronology based on the time of sunrise and sunset was devised. A code classified all hours within each bi-weekly period by this time system. The classification was further extended by dividing the year into solar seasons, defined as periods of time during which the distribution of solar hours is uniform.

The use of solar time as a major classification in the analysis of two years of hourly wind and temperature data obtained from six levels on the 420-ft meteorological tower at Brookhaven National Laboratory resulted in a better understanding of the relationships between the variables than could have been obtained by the use of standard time. Results of several lapse-rate and wind-profile studies made using both standard and solar time demonstrated the advantage of the latter system. Application of this method to other problems and regions is discussed.

1 Research carried out under the auspices of the United States Atomic Energy Commission and the Air Force Cambridge Research Center.

In order to effect a more consistent grouping of hourly meteorological data influenced by the diurnal cycle, a chronology based on the time of sunrise and sunset was devised. A code classified all hours within each bi-weekly period by this time system. The classification was further extended by dividing the year into solar seasons, defined as periods of time during which the distribution of solar hours is uniform.

The use of solar time as a major classification in the analysis of two years of hourly wind and temperature data obtained from six levels on the 420-ft meteorological tower at Brookhaven National Laboratory resulted in a better understanding of the relationships between the variables than could have been obtained by the use of standard time. Results of several lapse-rate and wind-profile studies made using both standard and solar time demonstrated the advantage of the latter system. Application of this method to other problems and regions is discussed.

1 Research carried out under the auspices of the United States Atomic Energy Commission and the Air Force Cambridge Research Center.

Save