Improved Ocean Surface Temperatures From Space—Comparisons With Drifting Buoys

Alan E. Strong National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Suitland, MD 20233

Search for other papers by Alan E. Strong in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
and
E. Paul McClain National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Suitland, MD 20233

Search for other papers by E. Paul McClain in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Multi-window infrared measurements, together with visual channel observations, enable relatively high-resolution and accurate local, regional, and global retrievals of ocean surface temperatures to be repetitively and routinely obtained from operational environmental satellites. Drifting buoys appear to be the best means to date of validating the satellite estimates. Root mean square differences of about 0.6°C are found between satellite and drifter, whereas with ships-of-opportunity they are 1.8°C. Fixed buoy comparisons fall between these extremes.

Multi-window infrared measurements, together with visual channel observations, enable relatively high-resolution and accurate local, regional, and global retrievals of ocean surface temperatures to be repetitively and routinely obtained from operational environmental satellites. Drifting buoys appear to be the best means to date of validating the satellite estimates. Root mean square differences of about 0.6°C are found between satellite and drifter, whereas with ships-of-opportunity they are 1.8°C. Fixed buoy comparisons fall between these extremes.

Save