Automatic Monitoring of Aviation Terminal Forecasts

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  • 1 Techniques Development Laboratory, Office of Systems Development, National Weather Service
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One of the goals of the Automation of Field Operations and Services (AFOS) was to implement a computer program to automatically monitor aviation terminal forecasts at National Weather Service (NWS) forecast offices. Such a program has now been developed. The program can be initiated either automatically at predefined times or by the forecaster at any time. Once initiated, the program compares the information in the latest terminal forecast and surface airway observation at each designated terminal to a set of amendment and alert criteria. It then notifies the forecaster via an audio or visual alarm if any terminal forecast needs amending, or may need amending in the near future, due to changing weather conditions.

The program successfully underwent extensive operational field tests at four National Weather Service forecast offices during 1983. Analysis of the test results showed that, overall, the program performed very well and was found to be useful by the forecasters. In early 1984, the program was issued to each of the National Weather Service regional headquarters for use by the individual field offices. In response to evaluations provided by the forecasters during the field tests, an improved program was developed and is being tested at several forecast offices.

One of the goals of the Automation of Field Operations and Services (AFOS) was to implement a computer program to automatically monitor aviation terminal forecasts at National Weather Service (NWS) forecast offices. Such a program has now been developed. The program can be initiated either automatically at predefined times or by the forecaster at any time. Once initiated, the program compares the information in the latest terminal forecast and surface airway observation at each designated terminal to a set of amendment and alert criteria. It then notifies the forecaster via an audio or visual alarm if any terminal forecast needs amending, or may need amending in the near future, due to changing weather conditions.

The program successfully underwent extensive operational field tests at four National Weather Service forecast offices during 1983. Analysis of the test results showed that, overall, the program performed very well and was found to be useful by the forecasters. In early 1984, the program was issued to each of the National Weather Service regional headquarters for use by the individual field offices. In response to evaluations provided by the forecasters during the field tests, an improved program was developed and is being tested at several forecast offices.

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