Initialization of Soil-Water Content in Regional-Scale Atmospheric Prediction Models

Christopher B. Smith
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Mercedes N. Lakhtakia
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William J. Capehart
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Toby N. Carlson
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The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of determining the soil-water content fields required as initial conditions for land surface components within atmospheric prediction models. This is done using a model of the hydrologic balance and conventional meteorological observations, land cover, and soils information.

A discussion is presented of the subgrid-scale effects, the integration time, and the choice of vegetation type on the soil-water content patterns. Finally, comparisons are made between two The Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research mesoscale model simulations, one using climatological fields and the other one using the soil-moisture fields produced by this new method.

*Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania (Current address: MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, Massachusetts).

+Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania.

**Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania.

Corresponding author address: Mercedes N. Lakhtakia, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University, 248 Deike Building, University Park, PA 16802-5013.

The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of determining the soil-water content fields required as initial conditions for land surface components within atmospheric prediction models. This is done using a model of the hydrologic balance and conventional meteorological observations, land cover, and soils information.

A discussion is presented of the subgrid-scale effects, the integration time, and the choice of vegetation type on the soil-water content patterns. Finally, comparisons are made between two The Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research mesoscale model simulations, one using climatological fields and the other one using the soil-moisture fields produced by this new method.

*Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania (Current address: MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, Massachusetts).

+Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania.

**Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania.

Corresponding author address: Mercedes N. Lakhtakia, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University, 248 Deike Building, University Park, PA 16802-5013.
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