Reassessing the Impact of Two Historical Florida Hurricanes

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This paper reexamines two historic South Florida hurricanes, the “Miami” Hurricane of 1926, and the “Okeechobee” Hurricane of 1928. These storms are frequently cited for their disastrous impacts, but the casualty figures currently associated with them are low due to underreporting of nonwhite persons and other sociological factors. More accurate information is available, and to put the impact of these storms in a better historical perspective, the casualty figures associated with them should be corrected.

National Weather Service, Weather Forecast Office, Miami, Florida

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Russell L. Pfost, National Weather Service, Miami Weather Forecast Office, 11691 SW 17th St., Miami, FL 33165, E-mail: Rusty.Pfost@noaa.gov

This paper reexamines two historic South Florida hurricanes, the “Miami” Hurricane of 1926, and the “Okeechobee” Hurricane of 1928. These storms are frequently cited for their disastrous impacts, but the casualty figures currently associated with them are low due to underreporting of nonwhite persons and other sociological factors. More accurate information is available, and to put the impact of these storms in a better historical perspective, the casualty figures associated with them should be corrected.

National Weather Service, Weather Forecast Office, Miami, Florida

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Russell L. Pfost, National Weather Service, Miami Weather Forecast Office, 11691 SW 17th St., Miami, FL 33165, E-mail: Rusty.Pfost@noaa.gov
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