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Advancing Wind-Waves Climate Science

The COWCLIP Project

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  • 1 CSIRO Wealth from Oceans Flagship and The Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
  • | 2 Climate Research Division, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • | 3 Institute of Coastal Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Geesthacht, Germany
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Since the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report (AR4), research interest in two key, but independent, roles of wind-waves in climate change science has increased. Greater understanding of wind-waves in the climate system is required as waves can be a key contributor to coastal sea level extremes (through wave setup) and subsequent flooding, cause over-topping of sea defenses with consequent failure and damage to infrastructure or coastal erosion, and drive longshore drift and associated coastal sediment budgets. A comprehensive assessment of potential climate change–driven impacts on the coastal zone must therefore consider potential future changes in wave

Since the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report (AR4), research interest in two key, but independent, roles of wind-waves in climate change science has increased. Greater understanding of wind-waves in the climate system is required as waves can be a key contributor to coastal sea level extremes (through wave setup) and subsequent flooding, cause over-topping of sea defenses with consequent failure and damage to infrastructure or coastal erosion, and drive longshore drift and associated coastal sediment budgets. A comprehensive assessment of potential climate change–driven impacts on the coastal zone must therefore consider potential future changes in wave

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Mark Hemer, Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia, E-mail: mark.hemer@csiro.au

Since the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report (AR4), research interest in two key, but independent, roles of wind-waves in climate change science has increased. Greater understanding of wind-waves in the climate system is required as waves can be a key contributor to coastal sea level extremes (through wave setup) and subsequent flooding, cause over-topping of sea defenses with consequent failure and damage to infrastructure or coastal erosion, and drive longshore drift and associated coastal sediment budgets. A comprehensive assessment of potential climate change–driven impacts on the coastal zone must therefore consider potential future changes in wave

Since the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report (AR4), research interest in two key, but independent, roles of wind-waves in climate change science has increased. Greater understanding of wind-waves in the climate system is required as waves can be a key contributor to coastal sea level extremes (through wave setup) and subsequent flooding, cause over-topping of sea defenses with consequent failure and damage to infrastructure or coastal erosion, and drive longshore drift and associated coastal sediment budgets. A comprehensive assessment of potential climate change–driven impacts on the coastal zone must therefore consider potential future changes in wave

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Mark Hemer, Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia, E-mail: mark.hemer@csiro.au
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