Land Surface Albedo from Geostationary Satellites: A Multiagency Collaboration within SCOPE-CM

Alessio Lattanzio Makalumedia GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany

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Jörg Schulz European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, Darmstadt, Germany

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Jessica Matthews Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, North Carolina State University, and NOAA/National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina

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Arata Okuyama Japan Meteorological Agency, Tokyo, Japan

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Bertrand Theodore MOLTEK SAS, Villeneuve-Tolosane, France

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John J. Bates NOAA/National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina

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Kenneth R. Knapp NOAA/National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina

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Yuki Kosaka Japan Meteorological Agency, Tokyo, Japan

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Lothar Schüller European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, Darmstadt, Germany

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Climate has been recognized to have direct and indirect impact on society and economy, both in the long term and daily life. The challenge of understanding the climate system, with its variability and changes, is enormous and requires a joint long-term international commitment from research and governmental institutions. An important international body to coordinate worldwide climate monitoring efforts is the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) has the mission to provide coordination and the requirements for global observations and essential climate variables (ECVs) to monitor climate changes. The WMO-led activity on Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM) is responding to these requirements by ensuring a continuous and sustained generation of climate data records (CDRs) from satellite data in compliance with the principles and guidelines of GCOS. SCOPE-CM represents a new partnership between operational space agencies to coordinate the generation of CDRs. To this end, pilot projects for different ECVs, such as surface albedo, cloud properties, water vapor, atmospheric motion winds, and upper-tropospheric humidity, have been initiated. The coordinated activity on land surface albedo involves the operational meteorological satellite agencies in Europe [European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT)], in Japan [the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)], and in the United States [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)]. This paper presents the first results toward the generation of a unique land surface albedo CDR, involving five different geostationary satellite positions and approximately three decades of data starting in the 1980s, and combining close to 30 different satellite instruments.

*ADDITIONAL AFFILIATION: European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, Darmstadt, Germany

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Alessio Lattanzio, EUMETSAT, Eumetsat Allee 1, 64295 Darmstadt, Germany, E-mail: alessio.lattanzio@eumetsat.int

Climate has been recognized to have direct and indirect impact on society and economy, both in the long term and daily life. The challenge of understanding the climate system, with its variability and changes, is enormous and requires a joint long-term international commitment from research and governmental institutions. An important international body to coordinate worldwide climate monitoring efforts is the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) has the mission to provide coordination and the requirements for global observations and essential climate variables (ECVs) to monitor climate changes. The WMO-led activity on Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM) is responding to these requirements by ensuring a continuous and sustained generation of climate data records (CDRs) from satellite data in compliance with the principles and guidelines of GCOS. SCOPE-CM represents a new partnership between operational space agencies to coordinate the generation of CDRs. To this end, pilot projects for different ECVs, such as surface albedo, cloud properties, water vapor, atmospheric motion winds, and upper-tropospheric humidity, have been initiated. The coordinated activity on land surface albedo involves the operational meteorological satellite agencies in Europe [European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT)], in Japan [the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)], and in the United States [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)]. This paper presents the first results toward the generation of a unique land surface albedo CDR, involving five different geostationary satellite positions and approximately three decades of data starting in the 1980s, and combining close to 30 different satellite instruments.

*ADDITIONAL AFFILIATION: European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, Darmstadt, Germany

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Alessio Lattanzio, EUMETSAT, Eumetsat Allee 1, 64295 Darmstadt, Germany, E-mail: alessio.lattanzio@eumetsat.int
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