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Comments on “Monitoring and Understanding Trends in Extreme Storms: State of Knowledge”

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  • 1 DOC/NOAA/NWS/NCEP/National Hurricane Center, Miami, Florida
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Kunkel et al. (2013) reviewed the state of the science with regards to long-term changes and trends of various extreme storms that impact the continental United States. In particular, they addressed severe convective storms, precipitation, snowstorms, and—of interest to this comment—hurricanes. All of the analyses presented in Kunkel et al. (2013) (their Figs. 1–7 and Tables 1 and 2) were focused on observations taken over the continental United States, with the notable exception of hurricanes. Instead, their Fig. 5 provided data (updated from Kossin et al. 2007) for the entire North Atlantic and northwestern Pacific

Kunkel et al. (2013) reviewed the state of the science with regards to long-term changes and trends of various extreme storms that impact the continental United States. In particular, they addressed severe convective storms, precipitation, snowstorms, and—of interest to this comment—hurricanes. All of the analyses presented in Kunkel et al. (2013) (their Figs. 1–7 and Tables 1 and 2) were focused on observations taken over the continental United States, with the notable exception of hurricanes. Instead, their Fig. 5 provided data (updated from Kossin et al. 2007) for the entire North Atlantic and northwestern Pacific

The original article that was the subject of this comment/reply can be found at http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/BAMS-D-11-00262.1.

Kunkel et al. (2013) reviewed the state of the science with regards to long-term changes and trends of various extreme storms that impact the continental United States. In particular, they addressed severe convective storms, precipitation, snowstorms, and—of interest to this comment—hurricanes. All of the analyses presented in Kunkel et al. (2013) (their Figs. 1–7 and Tables 1 and 2) were focused on observations taken over the continental United States, with the notable exception of hurricanes. Instead, their Fig. 5 provided data (updated from Kossin et al. 2007) for the entire North Atlantic and northwestern Pacific

Kunkel et al. (2013) reviewed the state of the science with regards to long-term changes and trends of various extreme storms that impact the continental United States. In particular, they addressed severe convective storms, precipitation, snowstorms, and—of interest to this comment—hurricanes. All of the analyses presented in Kunkel et al. (2013) (their Figs. 1–7 and Tables 1 and 2) were focused on observations taken over the continental United States, with the notable exception of hurricanes. Instead, their Fig. 5 provided data (updated from Kossin et al. 2007) for the entire North Atlantic and northwestern Pacific

The original article that was the subject of this comment/reply can be found at http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/BAMS-D-11-00262.1.

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