• Antuña, J. C., A. Robock, A. M. Thompson, and O. L. Mayol-Bracero, 2012: US and Cuban scientific cooperation in atmospheric science. Atmospheric Sciences Section of the AGU Newsletter, Vol. 6, No. 2, pp. 1, 3, 4. [Available online at http://atmospheres.agu.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/2014/04/ASnewsletterVol6No2.pdf.]

  • Antuña-Marrero, J. C., R. Estevan Arredondo, and B. Barja González, 2012: Demonstrating the potential for first-class research in underdeveloped countries: Research on stratospheric aerosols and cirrus clouds optical properties, and radiative effects in Cuba (1988–2010). Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 93, 10171027, doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-11-00149.1.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Antuña-Marrero, J. C., M. Meghan Miller, G. Mattioli, K. Feaux, R. Anthes, J. Braun, G. Wang, and A. Robock: 2014: Partnering with Cuba: Weather extremes. Science, 345, 278, doi:10.1126/science.345.6194-278-a.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Braun, J. J., and Coauthors, 2012: Focused study of interweaving hazards across the Caribbean. Eos, Trans. Amer. Geophys. Union, 93, 89, doi:10.1029/2012EO090001.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Fink, G. R., A. I. Leshner, and V. C. Turekian, 2014: Science diplomacy with Cuba. Science, 344, 1065, doi:10.1126/science.1256312.

  • Kellogg, W. W., D. Atlas, D. S. Johnson, R. J. Reed, and K. C. Spengler, 1974: Visit to the People’s Republic of China: A report from the A.M.S. delegation. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 55, 12911330, doi:10.1175/1520-0477(1974)055<1291:VTTPRO>2.0.CO;2.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ramos Guadalupe, L. E., 2014: Father Benito Viñes: The 19th-Century Life and Contributions of a Cuban Hurricane Observer and Scientist. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 172 pp.

  • Ware, R. H., and Coauthors, 2000: SuomiNet: A real-time national GPS network for atmospheric research and education. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 81, 677694, doi:10.1175/1520-0477(2000)081<0677:SARNGN>2

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 3 3 3
PDF Downloads 1 1 1

Cooperation on GPS Meteorology between the United States and Cuba

View More View Less
  • 1 University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado
  • | 2 Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey
  • | 3 Grupo de Óptica Atmosférica de Camagüey, Camagüey Meteorological Center, Camagüey, Cuba
  • | 4 San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California
  • | 5 University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado
  • | 6 Grupo de Óptica Atmosférica de Camagüey, Camagüey Meteorological Center, Camagüey, Cuba
Restricted access

Abstract

In May 2014 a team of atmospheric and geodetic scientists from UNAVCO and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) sent and helped set up a global positioning system (GPS) receiver to measure atmospheric water vapor at the Grupo de Óptica Atmosférica de Camagüey (GOAC) at the Camagüey Meteorological Center in Camagüey, Cuba. The GPS receiver immediately began to produce observations of precipitable water, which are being shared with the international meteorological community. Obtaining permission from both sides to send a highly sensitive instrument from the United States to Cuba was not easy. This paper describes the series of events that led to this achievement, beginning with a North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) workshop in Rome, Italy, in 1994 in which Alan Robock met a young Cuban scientist named Juan Carlos Antuña and accepted him as a graduate student at the University of Maryland, College Park. The GPS meteorology connection began with a March 2007 visit of a delegation from the United States headed by then American Meteorological Society (AMS) President Richard Anthes to Havana, Cuba, at the invitation of the Cuban Meteorological Society president, Andrés Planas. These two threads led to this remarkable cooperation between Cuban and U.S. scientists. Several visits to Cuba beginning in 2010 by Robock, who met former President of Cuba Fidel Castro and the science advisor to the president of Cuba, played a significant role.

This is another instance (the visit of the AMS delegation to China in 1974 was a prime example) of how communication and visits between meteorologists in countries that are at odds on many other issues can lead to lasting collaborations that benefit both countries as well as the international community.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Richard Anthes, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, 3090 Center Green Dr., Boulder, CO 80301, E-mail: anthes@ucar.edu

Abstract

In May 2014 a team of atmospheric and geodetic scientists from UNAVCO and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) sent and helped set up a global positioning system (GPS) receiver to measure atmospheric water vapor at the Grupo de Óptica Atmosférica de Camagüey (GOAC) at the Camagüey Meteorological Center in Camagüey, Cuba. The GPS receiver immediately began to produce observations of precipitable water, which are being shared with the international meteorological community. Obtaining permission from both sides to send a highly sensitive instrument from the United States to Cuba was not easy. This paper describes the series of events that led to this achievement, beginning with a North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) workshop in Rome, Italy, in 1994 in which Alan Robock met a young Cuban scientist named Juan Carlos Antuña and accepted him as a graduate student at the University of Maryland, College Park. The GPS meteorology connection began with a March 2007 visit of a delegation from the United States headed by then American Meteorological Society (AMS) President Richard Anthes to Havana, Cuba, at the invitation of the Cuban Meteorological Society president, Andrés Planas. These two threads led to this remarkable cooperation between Cuban and U.S. scientists. Several visits to Cuba beginning in 2010 by Robock, who met former President of Cuba Fidel Castro and the science advisor to the president of Cuba, played a significant role.

This is another instance (the visit of the AMS delegation to China in 1974 was a prime example) of how communication and visits between meteorologists in countries that are at odds on many other issues can lead to lasting collaborations that benefit both countries as well as the international community.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Richard Anthes, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, 3090 Center Green Dr., Boulder, CO 80301, E-mail: anthes@ucar.edu
Save